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Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research 7/2022

22-01-2022 | Original Article

The visual size of graspable objects is needed to induce the potentiation of grasping behaviors even with verbal stimuli

Auteurs: Mohamed Halim Harrak, Loïc P. Heurley, Nicolas Morgado, Rocco Mennella, Vincent Dru

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 7/2022

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Abstract

Merely perceiving objects usually grasped with a power or a precision grip (e.g., an apple vs. a cherry) potentiate power-grip and precision-grip responses, respectively. According to the size-coding account, this potentiation effect is due to the compatibility between size codes associated with both stimuli and responses, rather than to the simulation of motor information stored at a conceptual level (i.e., the embodied account). At the stimulus level, size-coding would occur, because objects associated with a power grip are usually presented in a larger visual size than objects associated with a precision grip. However, this explanation is challenged by results, showing that reading nouns of objects associated with power or precision grip also leads to potentiation effects, even though the visual size of the displayed object is no longer perceived. Therefore, we designed three experiments to better understand this word-based potentiation effect and to investigate whether it relies on size codes. Our results showed a word-based potentiation effect only when the object nouns were interleaved with pictures depicting the objects in their typical visual size. We discuss the contributions of these results for both the size-coding account and the embodied account of the potentiation effect of grasping behaviors.
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Voetnoten
1
Of note, potentiation effects have been explained via three different concepts: micro-affordances, motor simulation, and motor representations (for a discussion, see Chong & Proctor, 2020). In this article, we only used the concept of micro-affordances and motor simulation for a simplification.
 
2
We conducted our power analysis based on the potentiation effect reported by Tucker and Ellis (2004) for their Experiment 3. They said: “Averaged over both images and words the compatibility effect was highly significant for both measures of performance. Reaction times for compatible trials were on average 10.1 ms faster, F(1, 69) = 24.8, p < .001.” From this statement, we computed the corresponding \({\upeta }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\)= .26 and its bias-corrected version \({\upomega }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\)= .25 (e.g., Lakens, 2013, for a brief discussion on the advantages of \({\upomega }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\) over \({\upeta }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\)). The results of the power analyses using \({\upeta }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\)= .26 or \({\upomega }_{\mathrm{p}}^{2}\)= .25 yielded very similar sample size (n = 26 vs. n = 27, respectively). We chose to report the results of the analysis conducted with the smallest effect size.
 
3
For each experiment, as well as for the between-experiment analysis, we run linear mixed models which largely confirmed ANOVA results. Detailed method and results are available in the “supplementary material”, specifically in Table S2 (results for the three experiments separately) and S3 (results for Experiments 1 and 2 combined). Raw data of all experiments are available online (see https://​osf.​io/​fqhu5).
 
4
Obviously, in French, we did not use the words “APPLE” and “CHERRY”, but a similar reasoning applies to the French words we used (see Appendix 1).
 
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
The visual size of graspable objects is needed to induce the potentiation of grasping behaviors even with verbal stimuli
Auteurs
Mohamed Halim Harrak
Loïc P. Heurley
Nicolas Morgado
Rocco Mennella
Vincent Dru
Publicatiedatum
22-01-2022
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 7/2022
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-021-01635-x

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