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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 8/2008

01-09-2008 | Brief Report

Brief Report: Do Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Think They Know Their Own Minds?

Auteurs: Peter Mitchell, Kelly O’Keefe

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders | Uitgave 8/2008

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Abstract

How much do individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) think they know about their inner states? To find out, we asked 24 participants with ASD and 24 non-clinical participants to rate how well they knew about six topics of self knowledge; they also rated how well a comparison individual knew these things about them. Participants with ASD differed from the non-clinical participants in assigning about the same amount of knowledge to the comparison individual as to themselves. Non-clinical participants, in contrast, assigned relatively more knowledge to themselves. The findings are consistent with the possibility that individuals with ASD do not appreciate the value of having first-person privileged access to their own inner states.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Brief Report: Do Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorder Think They Know Their Own Minds?
Auteurs
Peter Mitchell
Kelly O’Keefe
Publicatiedatum
01-09-2008
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders / Uitgave 8/2008
Print ISSN: 0162-3257
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3432
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-007-0530-x

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