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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence 7/2021

28-04-2021 | Empirical Research

Stereotype Threat in High School Classrooms: How It Links to Teacher Mindset Climate, Mathematics Anxiety, and Achievement

Auteurs: Eunjin Seo, You-kyung Lee

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence | Uitgave 7/2021

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Abstract

As stereotype threat was initially examined in experimental settings, the effects of such threats have often been tested by temporarily manipulating social identity threats. This study expands the literature by examining 9th-grade adolescents’ naturalistic stereotype threat, using data from the National Study of Learning Mindsets in the United States (n ~= 6040, age: 13–17, Mage = 14.31, 6.9% Black boys, 6.5% Black girls, 13.1% Latinos, 12.3% Latinas, 31.5% White boys, 29.7% White girls). The results indicate that Black and Latinx students experience higher levels of stereotype threat in high school mathematics classrooms than do their White peers. When students perceive that their teachers have created fixed mindset climates, they experience greater stereotype threat. Stereotype threat, in turn, negatively predicts Black and Latino boys and White girls’ later achievement via anxiety. These findings highlight the importance of creating mathematics classrooms that cultivate a growth mindset and minimize social identity threat.
Voetnoten
1
In the current research, Black/Latinx refers to individuals with a Black or Latinx identity, not those with both Black and Latinx identities.
 
2
There were two additional items available in the dataset: (1) “My math teacher believes that everybody in my class can be very good at math” (reverse-coded), and (2) “My math teacher seems to believe students can’t really change how smart they are.” These two items were removed from the analysis after examining their measurement properties but before analyzing the data to test the hypotheses. These items lowered overall reliability and had a relatively low standardized factor loading in a confirmatory factor analysis (βs < 0.50). Compared to the three included items, the two excluded items may be difficult for students to judge.
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Stereotype Threat in High School Classrooms: How It Links to Teacher Mindset Climate, Mathematics Anxiety, and Achievement
Auteurs
Eunjin Seo
You-kyung Lee
Publicatiedatum
28-04-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Youth and Adolescence / Uitgave 7/2021
Print ISSN: 0047-2891
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-6601
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-021-01435-x

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