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Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness 3/2020

23-12-2019 | ORIGINAL PAPER

Self-Compassion and Time Perception of Past Negative Events

Auteurs: Yuki Miyagawa, Junichi Taniguchi

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 3/2020

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Abstract

Objectives

This study examined relationships among self-compassion, subjective distance, and time perception related to past negative events. Self-compassion involves a broad, mindful understanding of suffering without getting entangled in suffering. Therefore, self-compassion might enable people to feel subjectively distant from past adverse events and help them develop adaptive emotional reactions and time perception (i.e., meaning-making about time) concerning the events.

Methods

Two hundred eighty-two participants were randomly assigned to a negative (n = 139) or a positive (n = 143) event condition. After completing measures of self-compassion and self-esteem, they recalled either a negative or a positive event and estimated how far away they subjectively felt from that event. They also indicated the elapsed time from the event and responded to items assessing their emotional reactions and meaning-making about time.

Results

Self-compassion was associated with greater subjective distance from negative events, r = −.23, p = .005. Moreover, greater subjective distance mediated the relations of self-compassion to lower negative emotional reactions, B = − 0.147, 95% CI [− 0.292, − 0.034], and lower tendency to think that time was wasted on negative events, B = − 0.053, 95% CI [− 0.146, − 0.008]. Importantly, self-compassion was not related to subjective distance from positive events, r = .11, p = .182.

Conclusions

Results imply that people with high self-compassion would likely feel subjectively distant from past adverse events, which might help prevent negative meaning-making about time and negative emotional reactions concerning the events.
Literatuur
go back to reference Neff, K. D., & Germer, C. (2017). Self-compassion and psychological well-being. In E. M. Seppälä, E. Simon-Thomas, S. L. Brown, M. C. Worline, C. D. Cameron, & J. R. Doty (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compassion science (pp. 371–386). New York: Oxford University Press. Neff, K. D., & Germer, C. (2017). Self-compassion and psychological well-being. In E. M. Seppälä, E. Simon-Thomas, S. L. Brown, M. C. Worline, C. D. Cameron, & J. R. Doty (Eds.), The Oxford handbook of compassion science (pp. 371–386). New York: Oxford University Press.
go back to reference Updegraff, J. A., & Taylor, S. E. (2000). From vulnerability to growth: positive and negative effects of stressful life events. In J. H. Harvey & E. D. Miller (Eds.), Loss and trauma: General and close relationship perspectives (pp. 3–28). Philadelphia: Brunner-Routledge. Updegraff, J. A., & Taylor, S. E. (2000). From vulnerability to growth: positive and negative effects of stressful life events. In J. H. Harvey & E. D. Miller (Eds.), Loss and trauma: General and close relationship perspectives (pp. 3–28). Philadelphia: Brunner-Routledge.
go back to reference Zimbardo, P., & Boyd, J. (2008). The time paradox: the new psychology of time that will change your life. New York: Free Press. Zimbardo, P., & Boyd, J. (2008). The time paradox: the new psychology of time that will change your life. New York: Free Press.
Metagegevens
Titel
Self-Compassion and Time Perception of Past Negative Events
Auteurs
Yuki Miyagawa
Junichi Taniguchi
Publicatiedatum
23-12-2019
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 3/2020
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-019-01293-6

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