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Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research 6/2019

24-05-2019 | Original Article

Doubting the Diagnosis but Seeking a Talking Cure: An Experimental Investigation of Causal Explanations for Depression and Willingness to Accept Treatment

Auteurs: Taban Salem, E. Samuel Winer, D. Gage Jordan, Morgan M. Dorr

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 6/2019

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Abstract

In the current literature there is a general lack of research examining the impact of causal explanations on beliefs about psychotherapy, willingness to accept treatment, and treatment expectancies. The present study was aimed at experimentally investigating effects of causal explanations for depression on treatment-seeking behavior and beliefs. Participants at a large Southern university (N = 139; 78% female; average age 19.77) received bogus screening results indicating high depression risk, then viewed an explanation of depression etiology (fixed biological vs. malleable biopsychosocial) before receiving a treatment referral (antidepressant vs. psychotherapy). Participants accepted the cover story at face value, but some expressed doubts about the screening task’s ability to properly assess their individual depression. Within the skeptics, those given a fixed biological explanation for depression were relatively unwilling to accept either treatment, but those given a malleable biopsychosocial explanation were much more willing to accept psychotherapy. Importantly, differences in skepticism were not due to levels of actual depressive symptoms. Information about the malleability of depression may have a protective effect for persons who otherwise would not accept treatment.
Voetnoten
1
Within the fixed biological explanation group (n = 67), the item “recent traumatic events” exhibited the most extreme skewness (− 1.76) and kurtosis (3.56) values. Within the malleable explanation group (n = 72), “day to day problems or stress” exhibited the greatest skew (− 2.06) and “substance abuse” exhibited the most extreme kurtosis (4.86). Although somewhat elevated, these skewness and kurtosis values are still within acceptable limits (Kline 2010). Mann–Whitney tests were also conducted comparing causal explanation groups and yielded similar results.
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Doubting the Diagnosis but Seeking a Talking Cure: An Experimental Investigation of Causal Explanations for Depression and Willingness to Accept Treatment
Auteurs
Taban Salem
E. Samuel Winer
D. Gage Jordan
Morgan M. Dorr
Publicatiedatum
24-05-2019
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 6/2019
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-019-10027-w

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