Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence 8/2019

01-07-2019 | Empirical Research

Distinct Modalities of Electronic Communication and School Adjustment

Auteurs: David Schwartz, Annemarie Kelleghan, Sarah Malamut, Luiza Mali, Yana Ryjova, Andrea Hopmeyer, Tana Luo

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence | Uitgave 8/2019

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Social media platforms and instant messaging applications have a widespread presence in today’s secondary schools. However, the implications of these ubiquitous communication technologies for adolescent’s social functioning with peers and academic competence in the classroom are not well understood. In fact, research on adolescents’ digital lives has only rarely incorporated direct assessments of adjustment in school environments. The current study addressed these limitations with a school-based data collection. 376 adolescents (Mage = 14.4; 209 girls; including 29.2% Latino/Hispanic, 27.3% White, 28.2% mixed) were recruited from an urban high school and followed for one year. Social reputations were indexed via peer nominations and electronic communication tendencies were assessed using self-report questionnaires. Grade point averages, disciplinary events, and attendance data were obtained from school records. On a cross-sectional basis, frequent use of fashionable social networks (i.e., Instagram, Snapchat, and Twitter) was associated with popular-aggressive social reputations, poor achievement, and rule-breaking behavior. E-mail use, in contrast, was associated with academic competence. Longitudinal analyses were less conclusive because the examined constructs were highly stable across the period of data collection. The full pattern of findings indicates that electronic communication patterns can be a powerful marker of academic and social functioning at school.
Voetnoten
1
Previous investigators have often conducted comparisons between composite popularity (popularity–unpopularity) and social preference (liking–disliking) scores (e.g., Cillessen and Mayeux 2004). Social preference is an alternative conceptualization of social standing that indexes positive affective reactions from peers rather than high status, visibility, and prestige (Coie et al. 1982). For exploratory purposes, we conducted analyses with social preference and the composite popularity scores as simultaneous predictors. Social preference was not significantly correlated with any of the electronic communication variables (all p’s > 0.20) whereas the effects for popularity were identical to the pattern reported in Table 4.
 
2
SEM brings a number of analytic advantages, which should ultimately lead to a conservative perspective on the results. For exploratory purposes, we also mirrored our latent variable models with a series of regression analyses. Each of the T2 adjustment variables was predicted by gender, SES, the corresponding T1 adjustment variable, and the electric communication variable. Use of fashionable social networks was associated with increases in popularity (β = 0.069, p = 0.036) and truancy (β = 0.070, p = 0.040). E-mail use was associated with decreases in disciplinary violations (β = −0.118, p = 0.015).
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Arbuckle, J. L., & Wothke, W. (1999). AMOS 4.0 user’s guide. Chicago: SPSS Incorporated. Arbuckle, J. L., & Wothke, W. (1999). AMOS 4.0 user’s guide. Chicago: SPSS Incorporated.
go back to reference Barry, C. T., Sidoti, C. L., Briggs, S. M., Reiter, S. R., & Lindsey, R. A. (2017). Adolescent social media use and mental health from adolescent and parent perspectives. Journal of Adolescence, 61, 1–11. CrossRefPubMed Barry, C. T., Sidoti, C. L., Briggs, S. M., Reiter, S. R., & Lindsey, R. A. (2017). Adolescent social media use and mental health from adolescent and parent perspectives. Journal of Adolescence, 61, 1–11. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Bentler, P. M. (1990). Comparative fit indexes in structural models. Psychological Bulletin, 107, 238–246. CrossRefPubMed Bentler, P. M. (1990). Comparative fit indexes in structural models. Psychological Bulletin, 107, 238–246. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Best, P., Manktelow, R., & Taylor, B. (2014). Online communication, social media and adolescent wellbeing: a systematic narrative review. Children and Youth Services Review, 41, 27–36. CrossRef Best, P., Manktelow, R., & Taylor, B. (2014). Online communication, social media and adolescent wellbeing: a systematic narrative review. Children and Youth Services Review, 41, 27–36. CrossRef
go back to reference Browne, M. W., & Cudeck, R. (1993). Alternative ways of assessing model fit. Sage Focus Editions, 154, 136–136. Browne, M. W., & Cudeck, R. (1993). Alternative ways of assessing model fit. Sage Focus Editions, 154, 136–136.
go back to reference Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., Foulsham, T., Kingstone, A., & Henrich, J. (2013). Two ways to the top: evidence that dominance and prestige are distinct yet viable avenues to social rank and influence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 103–125. CrossRefPubMed Cheng, J. T., Tracy, J. L., Foulsham, T., Kingstone, A., & Henrich, J. (2013). Two ways to the top: evidence that dominance and prestige are distinct yet viable avenues to social rank and influence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 104, 103–125. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Cillessen, A. H. (2011). Toward a theory of popularity. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds.), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 273–299). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Cillessen, A. H. (2011). Toward a theory of popularity. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds.), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 273–299). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
go back to reference Cillessen, A. H., & Mayeux, L. (2004). From censure to reinforcement: developmental changes in the association between aggression and social status. Child Development, 75, 147–163. CrossRefPubMed Cillessen, A. H., & Mayeux, L. (2004). From censure to reinforcement: developmental changes in the association between aggression and social status. Child Development, 75, 147–163. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Coie, J. D., Dodge, K. A., & Coppotelli, H. (1982). Dimensions and types of social status: a cross-age perspective. Developmental Psychology, 18, 557–570. CrossRef Coie, J. D., Dodge, K. A., & Coppotelli, H. (1982). Dimensions and types of social status: a cross-age perspective. Developmental Psychology, 18, 557–570. CrossRef
go back to reference Crick, N. R., & Grotpeter, J. K. (1995). Relational aggression, gender, and social-psychological adjustment. Child Development, 66, 710–722. CrossRefPubMed Crick, N. R., & Grotpeter, J. K. (1995). Relational aggression, gender, and social-psychological adjustment. Child Development, 66, 710–722. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Dawes, M., & Xie, H. (2014). The role of popularity goal in early adolescents’ behaviors and popularity status. Developmental Psychology, 50, 489–497. CrossRefPubMed Dawes, M., & Xie, H. (2014). The role of popularity goal in early adolescents’ behaviors and popularity status. Developmental Psychology, 50, 489–497. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Dawes, M., & Xie, H. (2017). The trajectory of popularity goal during the transition to middle school. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 37, 852–883. CrossRef Dawes, M., & Xie, H. (2017). The trajectory of popularity goal during the transition to middle school. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 37, 852–883. CrossRef
go back to reference Desjarlais, M., & Willoughby, T. (2010). A longitudinal study of the relation between adolescent boys and girls’ computer use with friends and friendship quality: support for the social compensation or the rich-get-richer hypothesis? Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 896–905. CrossRef Desjarlais, M., & Willoughby, T. (2010). A longitudinal study of the relation between adolescent boys and girls’ computer use with friends and friendship quality: support for the social compensation or the rich-get-richer hypothesis? Computers in Human Behavior, 26, 896–905. CrossRef
go back to reference Dijkstra, J. K., Cillessen, A. H., Lindenberg, S., & Veenstra, R. (2010). Basking in reflected glory and its limits: why adolescents hang out with popular peers. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 20, 942–958. CrossRef Dijkstra, J. K., Cillessen, A. H., Lindenberg, S., & Veenstra, R. (2010). Basking in reflected glory and its limits: why adolescents hang out with popular peers. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 20, 942–958. CrossRef
go back to reference Dodge, K. A., Pettit, G. S., & Bates, J. E. (1994). Socialization mediators of the relation between socioeconomic status and child conduct problems. Child Development, 65, 649–665. CrossRefPubMed Dodge, K. A., Pettit, G. S., & Bates, J. E. (1994). Socialization mediators of the relation between socioeconomic status and child conduct problems. Child Development, 65, 649–665. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Duong, M. T., Schwartz, D., & McCarty, C. A. (2014). Do peers contribute to the achievement gap between Vietnamese‐American and Mexican- American adolescents? Social Development, 23, 196–214. CrossRefPubMed Duong, M. T., Schwartz, D., & McCarty, C. A. (2014). Do peers contribute to the achievement gap between Vietnamese‐American and Mexican- American adolescents? Social Development, 23, 196–214. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Fox, A. B., Rosen, J., & Crawford, M. (2009). Distractions, distractions: does instant messaging affect college students’ performance on a concurrent reading comprehension task? Cyber Psychology & Behavior, 12, 51–53. CrossRef Fox, A. B., Rosen, J., & Crawford, M. (2009). Distractions, distractions: does instant messaging affect college students’ performance on a concurrent reading comprehension task? Cyber Psychology & Behavior, 12, 51–53. CrossRef
go back to reference Gorman, A. H., Schwartz, D., Nakamoto, J., & Mayeux, L. (2011). Unpopularity and disliking among peers: partially distinct dimensions of adolescents’ social experiences. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 32, 208–217. CrossRef Gorman, A. H., Schwartz, D., Nakamoto, J., & Mayeux, L. (2011). Unpopularity and disliking among peers: partially distinct dimensions of adolescents’ social experiences. Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 32, 208–217. CrossRef
go back to reference Hollingshead, A. B. (1975). Four Factor Index of Social Status. New Haven, CT: Yale University. Hollingshead, A. B. (1975). Four Factor Index of Social Status. New Haven, CT: Yale University.
go back to reference Huang, C. (2018). Social network site use and academic achievement: a meta-analysis. Computers & Education, 119, 76–83. CrossRef Huang, C. (2018). Social network site use and academic achievement: a meta-analysis. Computers & Education, 119, 76–83. CrossRef
go back to reference Karpinski, A. C., Kirschner, P. A., Ozer, I., Mellott, J. A., & Ochwo, P. (2013). An exploration of social networking site use, multitasking, and academic performance among United States and European university students. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 1182–1192. CrossRef Karpinski, A. C., Kirschner, P. A., Ozer, I., Mellott, J. A., & Ochwo, P. (2013). An exploration of social networking site use, multitasking, and academic performance among United States and European university students. Computers in Human Behavior, 29, 1182–1192. CrossRef
go back to reference Karpinski, A. C., Kirschner, P. A., Shreffler, A. V., Albert, P. A., & Tomko, C. A. (2016). United States and European students’ social-networking site activities and academic performance. International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning, 6, 1–26. CrossRef Karpinski, A. C., Kirschner, P. A., Shreffler, A. V., Albert, P. A., & Tomko, C. A. (2016). United States and European students’ social-networking site activities and academic performance. International Journal of Cyber Behavior, Psychology and Learning, 6, 1–26. CrossRef
go back to reference Killeya-Jones, L. A., Nakajima, R., & Costanzo, P. R. (2007). Peer standing and substance use in early-adolescent grade-level networks: a short-term longitudinal study. Prevention Science, 8, 11–23. CrossRefPubMed Killeya-Jones, L. A., Nakajima, R., & Costanzo, P. R. (2007). Peer standing and substance use in early-adolescent grade-level networks: a short-term longitudinal study. Prevention Science, 8, 11–23. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Kline, R. B. (1998). Software review: software programs for structural equation modeling: Amos, EQS, and LISREL. Journal of Ppsychoeducational Assessment, 16, 343–364. CrossRef Kline, R. B. (1998). Software review: software programs for structural equation modeling: Amos, EQS, and LISREL. Journal of Ppsychoeducational Assessment, 16, 343–364. CrossRef
go back to reference Kuncel, N. R., Credé, M., & Thomas, L. L. (2005). The validity of self-reported grade point averages, class ranks, and test scores: a meta-analysis and review of the literature. Review of Educational Research, 75, 63–82. CrossRef Kuncel, N. R., Credé, M., & Thomas, L. L. (2005). The validity of self-reported grade point averages, class ranks, and test scores: a meta-analysis and review of the literature. Review of Educational Research, 75, 63–82. CrossRef
go back to reference LaFontana, K. M., & Cillessen, A. H. (2010). Developmental changes in the priority of perceived status in childhood and adolescence. Social Development, 19, 130–147. CrossRef LaFontana, K. M., & Cillessen, A. H. (2010). Developmental changes in the priority of perceived status in childhood and adolescence. Social Development, 19, 130–147. CrossRef
go back to reference Liu, D., Kirschner, P. A., & Karpinski, A. C. (2017). A meta-analysis of the relationship of academic performance and social network site use among adolescents and young adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 77, 148–157. CrossRef Liu, D., Kirschner, P. A., & Karpinski, A. C. (2017). A meta-analysis of the relationship of academic performance and social network site use among adolescents and young adults. Computers in Human Behavior, 77, 148–157. CrossRef
go back to reference Marker, C., Gnambs, T., & Appel, M. (2018). Active on Facebook and failing at school? Meta-analytic findings on the relationship between online social networking activities and academic achievement. Educational Psychology Review, 30, 651–677. CrossRef Marker, C., Gnambs, T., & Appel, M. (2018). Active on Facebook and failing at school? Meta-analytic findings on the relationship between online social networking activities and academic achievement. Educational Psychology Review, 30, 651–677. CrossRef
go back to reference Mayeux, L., Sandstrom, M. J., & Cillessen, A. H. (2008). Is being popular a risky proposition? Journal of Research on Adolescence, 18, 49–74. CrossRef Mayeux, L., Sandstrom, M. J., & Cillessen, A. H. (2008). Is being popular a risky proposition? Journal of Research on Adolescence, 18, 49–74. CrossRef
go back to reference McDonald, R. P., & Krane, W. R. (1977). A note on local identifiability and degrees of freedom in the asymptotic likelihood ratio test. British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, 30, 198–203. CrossRef McDonald, R. P., & Krane, W. R. (1977). A note on local identifiability and degrees of freedom in the asymptotic likelihood ratio test. British Journal of Mathematical and Statistical Psychology, 30, 198–203. CrossRef
go back to reference Nesi, J., Choukas-Bradley, S., & Prinstein, M. J. (2018a). Transformation of adolescent peer relations in the social media context: part 1—a theoretical framework and application to dyadic peer relationships. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 21, 267–294. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Nesi, J., Choukas-Bradley, S., & Prinstein, M. J. (2018a). Transformation of adolescent peer relations in the social media context: part 1—a theoretical framework and application to dyadic peer relationships. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 21, 267–294. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Nesi, J., Choukas-Bradley, S., & Prinstein, M. J. (2018b). Transformation of adolescent peer relations in the social media context: part 2—application to peer group processes and future directions for research. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 21, 295–319. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Nesi, J., Choukas-Bradley, S., & Prinstein, M. J. (2018b). Transformation of adolescent peer relations in the social media context: part 2—application to peer group processes and future directions for research. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 21, 295–319. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Nesi, J., & Prinstein, M. J. (2015). Using social media for social comparison and feedback-seeking: gender and popularity moderate associations with depressive symptoms. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 43, 1427–1438. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Nesi, J., & Prinstein, M. J. (2015). Using social media for social comparison and feedback-seeking: gender and popularity moderate associations with depressive symptoms. Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology, 43, 1427–1438. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Parkhurst, J. T., & Hopmeyer, A. (1998). Sociometric popularity and peer-perceived popularity: two distinct dimensions of peer status. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 18, 125–144. CrossRef Parkhurst, J. T., & Hopmeyer, A. (1998). Sociometric popularity and peer-perceived popularity: two distinct dimensions of peer status. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 18, 125–144. CrossRef
go back to reference Prinstein, M. J., Choukas-Bradley, S. C., Helms, S. W., Brechwald, W. A., & Rancourt, D. (2011). High peer popularity longitudinally predicts adolescent health risk behavior, or does it?: An examination of linear and quadratic associations. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 36, 980–990. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Prinstein, M. J., Choukas-Bradley, S. C., Helms, S. W., Brechwald, W. A., & Rancourt, D. (2011). High peer popularity longitudinally predicts adolescent health risk behavior, or does it?: An examination of linear and quadratic associations. Journal of Pediatric Psychology, 36, 980–990. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Rambaran, J. A., Hopmeyer, A., Schwartz, D., Steglich, C., Badaly, D., & Veenstra, R. (2017). Academic functioning and peer influences: a short‐term longitudinal study of network–behavior dynamics in middle adolescence. Child Development, 88, 523–543. CrossRefPubMed Rambaran, J. A., Hopmeyer, A., Schwartz, D., Steglich, C., Badaly, D., & Veenstra, R. (2017). Academic functioning and peer influences: a short‐term longitudinal study of network–behavior dynamics in middle adolescence. Child Development, 88, 523–543. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Rose, A. J., & Rudolph, K. D. (2006). A review of sex differences in peer relationship processes: potential trade-offs for the emotional and behavioral development of girls and boys. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 98–131. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Rose, A. J., & Rudolph, K. D. (2006). A review of sex differences in peer relationship processes: potential trade-offs for the emotional and behavioral development of girls and boys. Psychological Bulletin, 132, 98–131. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Rose, A. J., & Swenson, L. P. (2009). Do perceived popular adolescents who aggress against others experience emotional adjustment problems themselves? Developmental Psychology, 45, 868–872. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Rose, A. J., & Swenson, L. P. (2009). Do perceived popular adolescents who aggress against others experience emotional adjustment problems themselves? Developmental Psychology, 45, 868–872. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Rose, A. J., Swenson, L. P., & Waller, E. M. (2004). Overt and relational aggression and perceived popularity: developmental differences in concurrent and prospective relations. Developmental Psychology, 40, 378–387. CrossRefPubMed Rose, A. J., Swenson, L. P., & Waller, E. M. (2004). Overt and relational aggression and perceived popularity: developmental differences in concurrent and prospective relations. Developmental Psychology, 40, 378–387. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Sandstrom, M. J. (2011). The power of popularity. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 219–244). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Sandstrom, M. J. (2011). The power of popularity. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 219–244). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
go back to reference Schafer, J. L., & Graham, J. W. (2002). Missing data: our view of the state of the art. Psychological Methods, 7, 147–177. CrossRefPubMed Schafer, J. L., & Graham, J. W. (2002). Missing data: our view of the state of the art. Psychological Methods, 7, 147–177. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Scheiber, C., Reynolds, M. R., Hajovsky, D. B., & Kaufman, A. S. (2015). Gender differences in achievement in a large, nationally representative sample of children and adolescents. Psychology in the Schools, 52, 335–348. CrossRef Scheiber, C., Reynolds, M. R., Hajovsky, D. B., & Kaufman, A. S. (2015). Gender differences in achievement in a large, nationally representative sample of children and adolescents. Psychology in the Schools, 52, 335–348. CrossRef
go back to reference Schwartz, D., & Gorman, A. H. (2011). The high price of high status. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds.), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 245–270). New York, NY: The Guilford Press. Schwartz, D., & Gorman, A. H. (2011). The high price of high status. In A. H. Cillessen, D. Schwartz & L. Mayeux (Eds.), Popularity in the Peer System (pp. 245–270). New York, NY: The Guilford Press.
go back to reference Schwartz, D., Gorman, A. H., Nakamoto, J., & McKay, T. (2006). Popularity, social acceptance, and aggression in adolescent peer groups: links with academic performance and school attendance. Developmental Psychology, 46, 1116–1127. CrossRef Schwartz, D., Gorman, A. H., Nakamoto, J., & McKay, T. (2006). Popularity, social acceptance, and aggression in adolescent peer groups: links with academic performance and school attendance. Developmental Psychology, 46, 1116–1127. CrossRef
go back to reference Schwartz, D., Kelly, B. M., & Duong, M. T. (2013). Do academically-engaged adolescents experience social sanctions from the peer group? Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42, 1319–1330. CrossRefPubMed Schwartz, D., Kelly, B. M., & Duong, M. T. (2013). Do academically-engaged adolescents experience social sanctions from the peer group? Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 42, 1319–1330. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Schwartz, D., Kelly, B. M., Mali, L. V., & Duong, M. T. (2016). Exposure to violence in the community predicts friendships with academically disengaged peers during middle adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1786–1799. CrossRefPubMed Schwartz, D., Kelly, B. M., Mali, L. V., & Duong, M. T. (2016). Exposure to violence in the community predicts friendships with academically disengaged peers during middle adolescence. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 1786–1799. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Schwarz, N. (1999). Self-reports: how the questions shape the answers. American Psychologist, 54, 93–105. CrossRef Schwarz, N. (1999). Self-reports: how the questions shape the answers. American Psychologist, 54, 93–105. CrossRef
go back to reference Shapiro, L. A. S., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing up wired: social networking sites and adolescent psychosocial development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17, 1–18. CrossRefPubMedCentral Shapiro, L. A. S., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing up wired: social networking sites and adolescent psychosocial development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17, 1–18. CrossRefPubMedCentral
go back to reference Shen, C., & Williams, D. (2011). Unpacking time online: connecting internet and massively multiplayer online game use with psychosocial well-being. Communication Research, 38, 123–149. CrossRef Shen, C., & Williams, D. (2011). Unpacking time online: connecting internet and massively multiplayer online game use with psychosocial well-being. Communication Research, 38, 123–149. CrossRef
go back to reference Shiffman, S., Stone, A. A., & Hufford, M. R. (2008). Ecological momentary assessment. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 4, 1–32. CrossRefPubMed Shiffman, S., Stone, A. A., & Hufford, M. R. (2008). Ecological momentary assessment. Annual Review of Clinical Psychology, 4, 1–32. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Tabachnick, B. G., & Fidell, L. S. (2006). Using multivariate statistics. 5th Edn. Boston: Allyn & Bacon/Pearson Education. Tabachnick, B. G., & Fidell, L. S. (2006). Using multivariate statistics. 5th Edn. Boston: Allyn & Bacon/Pearson Education.
go back to reference Throuvala, M. A., Griffiths, M. D., Rennoldson, M., & Kuss, D. J. (2019). Motivational processes and dysfunctional mechanisms of social media use among adolescents: a qualitative focus group study. Computers in Human Behavior, 93, 164–175. CrossRef Throuvala, M. A., Griffiths, M. D., Rennoldson, M., & Kuss, D. J. (2019). Motivational processes and dysfunctional mechanisms of social media use among adolescents: a qualitative focus group study. Computers in Human Behavior, 93, 164–175. CrossRef
go back to reference Trepte, S., Reinecke, L., & Juechems, K. (2012). The social side of gaming: how playing online computer games creates online and offline social support. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 832–839. CrossRef Trepte, S., Reinecke, L., & Juechems, K. (2012). The social side of gaming: how playing online computer games creates online and offline social support. Computers in Human Behavior, 28, 832–839. CrossRef
go back to reference Troop-Gordon, W., Visconti, K. J., & Kuntz, K. J. (2011). Perceived popularity during early adolescence: links to declining school adjustment among aggressive youth. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 31, 125–151. CrossRef Troop-Gordon, W., Visconti, K. J., & Kuntz, K. J. (2011). Perceived popularity during early adolescence: links to declining school adjustment among aggressive youth. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 31, 125–151. CrossRef
go back to reference Wohlwill, J. F.(1973). The environment is not in the head. Environmental Design Research, 2, 166–181. Wohlwill, J. F.(1973). The environment is not in the head. Environmental Design Research, 2, 166–181.
go back to reference Yang, C., & Brown, B. (2016). Online self-presentation on Facebook and self development during the college transition. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 402–416. CrossRefPubMed Yang, C., & Brown, B. (2016). Online self-presentation on Facebook and self development during the college transition. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 45, 402–416. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Yau, J. C., & Reich, S. M. (2019). “It’s just a lot of work”: adolescents’ self‐presentation norms and practices on Facebook and Instagram. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 29, 196–209. CrossRefPubMed Yau, J. C., & Reich, S. M. (2019). “It’s just a lot of work”: adolescents’ self‐presentation norms and practices on Facebook and Instagram. Journal of Research on Adolescence, 29, 196–209. CrossRefPubMed
Metagegevens
Titel
Distinct Modalities of Electronic Communication and School Adjustment
Auteurs
David Schwartz
Annemarie Kelleghan
Sarah Malamut
Luiza Mali
Yana Ryjova
Andrea Hopmeyer
Tana Luo
Publicatiedatum
01-07-2019
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Youth and Adolescence / Uitgave 8/2019
Print ISSN: 0047-2891
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-6601
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-019-01061-8