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16-09-2015 | Uitgave 4/2015

Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review 4/2015

Clinical Effectiveness of Family Therapeutic Interventions Embedded in General Pediatric Primary Care Settings for Parental Mental Health: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis

Tijdschrift:
Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review > Uitgave 4/2015
Auteurs:
Fallon Cluxton-Keller, Anne W. Riley, Sassan Noazin, Mfon Valencia Umoren
Belangrijke opmerkingen
This publication was made possible by the Johns Hopkins Institute for Clinical and Translational Research (ICTR) which is funded in part by Grant Number UL1 TR 001079 from the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS) a component of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and NIH Roadmap for Medical Research. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official view of the Johns Hopkins ICTR, NCATS or NIH.

Abstract

The aim of this systematic review and meta-analysis was to synthesize the available evidence on embedded family therapy interventions in pediatrics and impacts on parental mental health and family functioning outcomes. The Cochrane Collaboration guidelines for systematic reviews and meta-analysis were used for this study. Six electronic databases were searched for randomized controlled trials and cluster randomized trials. The Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias Tool and GRADE system were used to rate the quality of evidence of the included studies. The primary outcomes included parental distress, parental depressive symptoms, and dysfunctional parent–child interaction. Fixed effects models showed statistically significant reductions in parental distress at 6-month and 12-month post-intervention in favor of the intervention group. Family therapy model, intervention level, delivery modality, and dosage moderated intervention impacts on parental distress. Fixed effects models showed statistically significant reductions in parental depressive symptoms and in dysfunctional parent–child interaction in favor of the intervention group. Family therapy interventions can be successfully embedded in general pediatric primary care, and intended outcomes are achieved in this setting. Recommendations for future research and implications for policy development are discussed.

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