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01-08-2017 | Show and Tell | Uitgave 4/2017 Open Access

Perspectives on Medical Education 4/2017

Preparing medical students for clinical practice: easing the transition

Tijdschrift:
Perspectives on Medical Education > Uitgave 4/2017
Auteurs:
Alexandra R. Teagle, Maria George, Nicola Gainsborough, Inam Haq, Michael Okorie
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Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi: 10.​1007/​s40037-017-0352-2) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

The transition from medical student to junior doctor is a challenge; the UK General Medical Council has issued guidance emphasizing the importance of adequate preparation of medical students for clinical practice. This study aimed to determine whether a junior doctor-led simulation-based course is an effective way of preparing final year medical students for practice as a junior doctor.
We piloted a new ‘preparation for practice’ course for final year medical students prior to beginning as Foundation Year 1 (first year of practice) doctors. The course ran over three days and consisted of four simulated stations: ward round, prescribing, handover, and lessons learnt. Quantitative and qualitative feedback was obtained.
A total of 120 students attended (40 on each day) and feedback was collected from 95 of them. Using a scale of 1 (lowest) to 5 (highest), feedback was positive, with 99% and 96% rating 4 or 5 for the overall quality of the program and the relevance of the program content, respectively. A score of 5 was awarded by 67% of students for the ward round station; 58% for the handover station; 71% for the prescribing station, and 35% for the lessons learnt station. Following the prescribing station, students reported increased confidence in their prescribing.
Preparation for practice courses and simulation are an effective and enjoyable way of easing the transition from medical student to junior doctor. Together with ‘on-the-job’ shadowing time, such programs can be used to improve students’ confidence, competence, and ultimately patient safety and quality of care.
Extra materiaal
Confidential questionnaire/feedback form the students completed after the course.
40037_2017_352_MOESM1_ESM.docx
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