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17-05-2017 | Review Article | Uitgave 5/2017 Open Access

Perspectives on Medical Education 5/2017

Social studying and learning among medical students: a scoping review

Tijdschrift:
Perspectives on Medical Education > Uitgave 5/2017
Auteurs:
Daniela Keren, Jocelyn Lockyer, Rachel H. Ellaway
Belangrijke opmerkingen

Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi: 10.​1007/​s40037-017-0358-9) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

Introduction

Medical students study in social groups, which influence their learning, but few studies have investigated the characteristics of study groups and the impacts they have on students’ learning. A scoping review was conducted on the topic of informal social studying and learning within medical education with the aim of appraising what is known regarding medical student attitudes to group study, the impact of group study on participants, and the methods that have been employed to study this.

Methods

Using Arksey and O’Malley’s scoping review principles, MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL were searched, along with hand-searching and a targeted search of the grey literature; 18 peer reviewed and 17 grey literature records were included.

Results

Thematic conceptual analysis identified a number of themes, including: the nature of group study; the utility and value of group studying including social learning facilitating student engagement, social learning as a source of motivation and accountability, and social learning as a source of wellbeing; and student preferences related to group studying, including its homophilic nature, transgressiveness, and effectiveness. Despite these emerging factors, the evidence base for this phenomenon is small.

Discussion

The findings in this scoping review demonstrate a clear role for social interaction outside of the classroom, and encourage us to consider the factors in student networking, and the implications of this on medical students’ academics. We also highlight areas in need of future research to allow us to better situate informal social learning within medical education and to enable educators to support this phenomenon.
Extra materiaal
Overview of the included studies
40037_2017_358_MOESM1_ESM.docx
Characteristics of the reviewed sources
40037_2017_358_MOESM2_ESM.docx
Literatuur
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