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07-05-2020 | COMMENTARY

Experimental Phenomenology and the Need for Psychology to Reconnect with its Philosophical Origins

Auteur: Chris Krägeloh

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 7/2020

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Excerpt

The present paper responds to Lundh (2019) and other phenomenological thought that has been applied to mindfulness research through proposals to use phenomenological methods to study the experiences associated with mindfulness and meditation practice. I have previously commented on the inadequacy of phenomenological inquiry in the context of nondual awareness (Krägeloh 2019). As nondual awareness refers to pre-reflective experience and is commonly understood in the context of the Buddhist philosophy of emptiness, the phenomenological process of working up a structure or a co-generated essence of experience results in an objectification of nondual awareness and thus places it within the domain of language and concepts. Certainly, nondual awareness is only a very specific phenomenon that has been discussed in the mindfulness research literature, and Lundh’s (2019) proposal for an experimental phenomenology applies to a much broader range of mindfulness-related experiences. Nevertheless, philosophical reflections such as the ones I presented in relation to nondual awareness (Krägeloh 2019) will continue to be relevant here, particularly since the techniques used in mindfulness-based interventions have originally been adapted from Buddhist traditions where philosophical reflection, meditation, and experience are intertwined (Sayrak 2019). Even if the secularized mindfulness practices are considered purely from the scientific perspective of Western psychology, Lundh’s (2019) proposal to study experience in terms of independent and dependent variables and to provide so-called fine-grained descriptions requires that experience be clearly defined. Lundh’s (2019) article reveals psychology’s more recent tendency to shy away from philosophical discussion, including in the mindfulness literature (Krägeloh et al. 2019). Below, I briefly highlight how experimental phenomenology is linked to the early literature on introspection and how the philosophical considerations at that time continue to be relevant. …
Literatuur
go back to reference Depraz, N., Varela, F. J., & Vermersch, P. (Eds.). (2003). On becoming aware: a pragmatics of experiencing. John Benjamins Publishing Company. Depraz, N., Varela, F. J., & Vermersch, P. (Eds.). (2003). On becoming aware: a pragmatics of experiencing. John Benjamins Publishing Company.
go back to reference Krägeloh, C. U., Henning, M. A., Medvedev, O. N., Feng, X. J., Moir, F., Billington, R., & Siegert, R. J. (2019). Mindfulness-based intervention research: characteristics, approaches, and developments. Routledge. Krägeloh, C. U., Henning, M. A., Medvedev, O. N., Feng, X. J., Moir, F., Billington, R., & Siegert, R. J. (2019). Mindfulness-based intervention research: characteristics, approaches, and developments. Routledge.
go back to reference Sayrak, I. O. (2019). Mindfulness beyond self-help: the context of virtue, concentration, and wisdom. Journal of Communication and Religion, 42(4), 28–38. Sayrak, I. O. (2019). Mindfulness beyond self-help: the context of virtue, concentration, and wisdom. Journal of Communication and Religion, 42(4), 28–38.
Metagegevens
Titel
Experimental Phenomenology and the Need for Psychology to Reconnect with its Philosophical Origins
Auteur
Chris Krägeloh
Publicatiedatum
07-05-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 7/2020
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-020-01388-5

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