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Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness 1/2022

22-11-2021 | ORIGINAL PAPER

Dissociable Associations of Facets of Mindfulness with Worry, Rumination, and Transdiagnostic Perseverative Thought

Auteurs: Justine S. Thompson, Nabila Jamal-Orozco, Lauren S. Hallion

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 1/2022

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Abstract

Objectives

Perseverative thought, an umbrella term encapsulating thoughts that are repetitive and difficult-to-control (e.g., worry; rumination), is a major feature and mechanism of anxiety and depression. Mindfulness-based interventions show promise for reducing perseverative thought and improving present-moment focus, but efforts to tailor or optimize these interventions remain rare. Given the multifaceted nature of mindfulness, a nuanced understanding of how each facet (awareness; nonjudgment; nonreactivity; describing) incrementally relates to different facets of perseverative thought may help to inform and expedite treatment development.

Methods

We tested hypothesized associations between dissociable facets of mindfulness and perseverative thought in three well-powered, independent samples (N = 289 undergraduate students; N = 286 crowdsourced participants; N = 277 community participants with elevated anxiety or depression).

Results

Consistent with predictions, and across all three samples, greater present-moment awareness, nonjudgment, and nonreactivity were all uniquely (incrementally) and inversely related to transdiagnostic perseverative thought. Nonreactivity was inversely and incrementally related to trait worry, beyond variance shared with transdiagnostic perseverative thought, rumination, and other mindfulness facets. Nonjudgment was similarly uniquely related to rumination. Unexpectedly, present-moment awareness predicted higher trait worry when other facets were controlled. Findings were robust to sensitivity analyses controlling for general distress.

Conclusions

The present study establishes and replicates in three independent samples a broad inverse association between present-moment awareness and transdiagnostic perseverative thought, and specific associations between nonreactivity with trait worry, and nonjudgment with trait rumination. Experimental research is needed to test hypothesized causal pathways to inform theory and development of transdiagnostic and personalized treatments.
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Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Dissociable Associations of Facets of Mindfulness with Worry, Rumination, and Transdiagnostic Perseverative Thought
Auteurs
Justine S. Thompson
Nabila Jamal-Orozco
Lauren S. Hallion
Publicatiedatum
22-11-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 1/2022
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-021-01747-w