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Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research 12/2021

Open Access 28-04-2021

Response shift in patient-reported outcomes: definition, theory, and a revised model

Auteurs: Antoine Vanier, Frans J. Oort, Leah McClimans, Nikki Ow, Bernice G. Gulek, Jan R. Böhnke, Mirjam Sprangers, Véronique Sébille, Nancy Mayo, the Response Shift - in Sync Working Group

Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research | Uitgave 12/2021

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Abstract

Purpose

The extant response shift definitions and theoretical response shift models, while helpful, also introduce predicaments and theoretical debates continue. To address these predicaments and stimulate empirical research, we propose a more specific formal definition of response shift and a revised theoretical model.

Methods

This work is an international collaborative effort and involved a critical assessment of the literature.

Results

Three main predicaments were identified. First, the formal definitions of response shift need further specification and clarification. Second, previous models were focused on explaining change in the construct intended to be measured rather than explaining the construct at multiple time points and neglected the importance of using at least two time points to investigate response shift. Third, extant models do not explicitly distinguish the measure from the construct. Here we define response shift as an effect occurring whenever observed change (e.g., change in patient-reported outcome measures (PROM) scores) is not fully explained by target change (i.e., change in the construct intended to be measured). The revised model distinguishes the measure (e.g., PROM) from the underlying target construct (e.g., quality of life) at two time points. The major plausible paths are delineated, and the underlying assumptions of this model are explicated.

Conclusion

It is our hope that this refined definition and model are useful in the further development of response shift theory. The model with its explicit list of assumptions and hypothesized relationships lends itself for critical, empirical examination. Future studies are needed to empirically test the assumptions and hypothesized relationships.

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Metagegevens
Titel
Response shift in patient-reported outcomes: definition, theory, and a revised model
Auteurs
Antoine Vanier
Frans J. Oort
Leah McClimans
Nikki Ow
Bernice G. Gulek
Jan R. Böhnke
Mirjam Sprangers
Véronique Sébille
Nancy Mayo
the Response Shift - in Sync Working Group
Publicatiedatum
28-04-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer International Publishing
Gepubliceerd in
Quality of Life Research / Uitgave 12/2021
Print ISSN: 0962-9343
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2649
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-021-02846-w