Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Research on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology 2/2021

27-11-2020

Where it Hurts the Most: Peer Interactions on Social Media and in Person are Differentially Associated with Emotional Reactivity and Sustained Affect Among Adolescent Girls

Auteurs: Jessica L. Hamilton, Quyen B. Do, Sophia Choukas-Bradley, Cecile D. Ladouceur, Jennifer S. Silk

Gepubliceerd in: Research on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology | Uitgave 2/2021

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Social media (SM) use has increasingly changed how adolescents interact with their peers, yet it remains unclear how peer interactions on social media differ from in-person peer interactions. The current study evaluated whether the context (social media or in-person) of adolescent girls’ worst and best peer interactions influenced their emotional responses to peer interactions and sustained affect in everyday life. In this study, a total of 110 adolescent girls (11–13 years old; mean age = 12.28 years) completed ecological momentary assessment (EMA) for 16 days following an initial baseline visit. Participants reported their worst (i.e., most negative) and best (i.e., most positive) interactions with peers since the last prompt, the context in which it occurred (social media or in-person), emotional reactivity during the interaction, and momentary affect. Multilevel models indicated that negative peer interactions that occurred on social media were more likely to be associated with sustained negative affect, but not negative emotional reactivity during the interaction. Positive interactions on social media were more likely to be associated with both lower positive emotional reactivity and lower sustained positive affect. Findings indicate that peer interactions on social media may differentially impact girls’ emotional reactivity and sustained affect, particularly for positive interactions with peers. Findings highlight that social media and in-person peer interactions may impact how girls experience and respond to positive and negative peer interactions, which may have implications for peer relationships and onset of psychopathology during this vulnerable period.
Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Literatuur
go back to reference Capaldi, D. M., & Rothbart, M. K. (1992). Development and validation of an early adolescent temperament measure. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 12, 153–173. CrossRef Capaldi, D. M., & Rothbart, M. K. (1992). Development and validation of an early adolescent temperament measure. The Journal of Early Adolescence, 12, 153–173. CrossRef
go back to reference Ellis, L. K., & Rothbart, M. K. (2001). Revision of the early adolescent temperament questionnaire. Paper presented at the Biennial meeting of the society for research in child development, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Ellis, L. K., & Rothbart, M. K. (2001). Revision of the early adolescent temperament questionnaire. Paper presented at the Biennial meeting of the society for research in child development, Minneapolis, Minnesota.
go back to reference Hamilton, J. L., Coulter, R. A., & Radovic, A. (2020). Mental health benefits and opportunities. In M. A. Moreno & A. J. Hoopes (Eds.), Technology and Adolescent Health: In Schools and Beyond (pp. 305–345). New York, NY: Elsevier. CrossRef Hamilton, J. L., Coulter, R. A., & Radovic, A. (2020). Mental health benefits and opportunities. In M. A. Moreno & A. J. Hoopes (Eds.), Technology and Adolescent Health: In Schools and Beyond (pp. 305–345). New York, NY: Elsevier. CrossRef
go back to reference Muris, P., & Meesters, C. (2009). Reactive and regulative temperament in youths: Psychometric evaluation of the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31(1), 7–19. CrossRef Muris, P., & Meesters, C. (2009). Reactive and regulative temperament in youths: Psychometric evaluation of the Early Adolescent Temperament Questionnaire-Revised. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 31(1), 7–19. CrossRef
go back to reference Nelson, E. E., Leibenluft, E., McClure, E. B., & Pine, D. S. (2005). The social re-orientation of adolescence: a neuroscience perspective on the process and its relation to psychopathology. Psychological Medicine, 35(2), 163–174. CrossRef Nelson, E. E., Leibenluft, E., McClure, E. B., & Pine, D. S. (2005). The social re-orientation of adolescence: a neuroscience perspective on the process and its relation to psychopathology. Psychological Medicine, 35(2), 163–174. CrossRef
go back to reference Olsen, M. K., & Schafer, J. L. (2001). A two-part random effects model for semicontinuous longitudinal data. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 96, 730–745. CrossRef Olsen, M. K., & Schafer, J. L. (2001). A two-part random effects model for semicontinuous longitudinal data. Journal of the American Statistical Association, 96, 730–745. CrossRef
go back to reference Petersen, A. C., Crockett, L., Richards, M., & Boxer, A. (1988). A self-report measure of pubertal status: Reliability, validity, and initial norms. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 17, 117–133. CrossRef Petersen, A. C., Crockett, L., Richards, M., & Boxer, A. (1988). A self-report measure of pubertal status: Reliability, validity, and initial norms. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 17, 117–133. CrossRef
go back to reference Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Safe. Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods (2nd ed.). Thousand Oaks, CA: Safe.
go back to reference Shapiro, L. A., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing Up Wired: Social Networking Sites and Adolescent Psychosocial Development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17(1), 1–18. CrossRef Shapiro, L. A., & Margolin, G. (2014). Growing Up Wired: Social Networking Sites and Adolescent Psychosocial Development. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review, 17(1), 1–18. CrossRef
go back to reference Walther, J. B. (2011). Theories of computer-mediated communication and interpersonal relations. In M. L. Knapp & A. Daly (Eds.), The handbook of interpersonal communication (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Sage. Walther, J. B. (2011). Theories of computer-mediated communication and interpersonal relations. In M. L. Knapp & A. Daly (Eds.), The handbook of interpersonal communication (4th ed.). Washington, DC: Sage.
Metagegevens
Titel
Where it Hurts the Most: Peer Interactions on Social Media and in Person are Differentially Associated with Emotional Reactivity and Sustained Affect Among Adolescent Girls
Auteurs
Jessica L. Hamilton
Quyen B. Do
Sophia Choukas-Bradley
Cecile D. Ladouceur
Jennifer S. Silk
Publicatiedatum
27-11-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Research on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology / Uitgave 2/2021
Print ISSN: 2730-7166
Elektronisch ISSN: 2730-7174
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10802-020-00725-5

Andere artikelen Uitgave 2/2021

Research on Child and Adolescent Psychopathology 2/2021 Naar de uitgave