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Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research 3/2021

19-11-2020 | Brief Report

The Role of Facial Appearance Concern and Appraisal Perspective in the Experience of Task-Irrelevant Intrusions

Auteurs: Laura Dondzilo, Ben Grafton, Colin MacLeod

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 3/2021

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Abstract

Background

The current study experimentally tested the hypothesis that elevated facial appearance concern is characterised by an elevated tendency to experience task-irrelevant intrusions (i.e., intrusions which serve to interfere with task performance) concerning an appearance-related event. Additionally, the study examined potentially interactive roles of facial concerns and the appraisal perspective adopted during this appearance-related event.

Methods

Sixty-six females, reporting either low or high facial concerns, were exposed to a standardised appearance-related event, which involved a photoshoot and the subsequent appraisal of the resulting photographs. Participants were induced to appraise these photographs from the perspective of either self or other. Following this, participants completed a task designed to assess subsequent task-irrelevant intrusions about the appearance-related event.

Results

Results revealed that high facial concern participants experienced both a greater frequency of, and more distressing, task-irrelevant intrusions about the appearance-related event than did their low facial concern counterparts. These group differences in task-irrelevant intrusions were equally evident, regardless of initial appraisal perspective.

Conclusions

The current findings are consistent with the hypothesis that elevated facial appearance concerns are underpinned by highly frequent and distressing task-irrelevant intrusions about past appearance-related experiences.
Voetnoten
1
Participants were not screened for clinically diagnosable BDD or eating disorders.
 
2
Contrasting individuals on the basis of extreme scores (e.g., top and bottom third) is a widely used convention in psychological research and this approach is particularly well-suited for use in small samples (Preacher et al. 2005).
 
3
A post-hoc sensitivity power analysis revealed that our sample was sufficient to detect medium-large main effects and interaction effects.
 
4
Prior studies employing photoshoot procedures have not specified photoshoot poses. Therefore, the present approach might be useful for future researchers seeking to establish photographic sets with the intention of ensuring diversity of appearance across photographs.
 
Literatuur
go back to reference American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, D.C: American Psychiatric Publishing. CrossRef American Psychiatric Association. (2013). Diagnostic and statistical manual of mental disorders (5th ed.). Washington, D.C: American Psychiatric Publishing. CrossRef
go back to reference Clark, D. A. (2005). Intrusive thoughts in clinical disorders: theory, research, and treatment. New York: The Guilford Press. Clark, D. A. (2005). Intrusive thoughts in clinical disorders: theory, research, and treatment. New York: The Guilford Press.
go back to reference Wilhelm, S., Phillips, K. A., & Steketee, G. (2013). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: A treatment manual. New York: Guilford Press. Wilhelm, S., Phillips, K. A., & Steketee, G. (2013). Cognitive-behavioral therapy for body dysmorphic disorder: A treatment manual. New York: Guilford Press.
Metagegevens
Titel
The Role of Facial Appearance Concern and Appraisal Perspective in the Experience of Task-Irrelevant Intrusions
Auteurs
Laura Dondzilo
Ben Grafton
Colin MacLeod
Publicatiedatum
19-11-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 3/2021
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-020-10179-0

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