Skip to main content
Top
Gepubliceerd in:

19-04-2018 | Original Article

The Moderating Effect of Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Strategies on Reappraisal: A Daily Diary Study

Auteurs: Tierney P. McMahon, Kristin Naragon-Gainey

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 5/2018

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Recent research has investigated how adaptive emotion regulation (ER) strategies and maladaptive ER strategies interact to predict symptoms, but little is known about how specific strategies interact with one another when used in daily life. The present investigation used daily diary data collected over two weeks from an unselected student sample (N = 109) to examine how reappraisal, a putatively adaptive ER strategy, interacts on a given occasion (within-person) and across occasions (between-person) with putatively maladaptive ER strategies (rumination, experiential avoidance, expressive suppression) to predict daily depression and social anxiety symptoms. Results revealed between-person interactions of reappraisal with rumination and experiential avoidance, wherein reappraisal was most negatively related to symptoms for individuals who frequently used rumination and experiential avoidance. There was a similar within-person interaction between reappraisal and expressive suppression. Implications for assessing daily and retrospective ER are discussed, as well as future directions for studying ER in daily life.
Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Voetnoten
1
Emotion regulation strategies that are generally positively associated with psychological symptoms and other negative outcomes are often referred to as “maladaptive,” whereas those that are associated with greater well-being or fewer symptoms are often referred to as “adaptive” (e.g., Aldao et al. 2010). We follow this convention for ease of communication, though we acknowledge that the outcome of a given strategy is variable and dependent upon context, and we return to this point in the “Discussion”.
 
2
There were no differences in ethnicity between those who declined participation in the daily diary study and those who were included in analyses. However, males were more likely to decline participation (χ2 = 14.351, df = 1, p < .001) and individuals who participated in the daily diary study reported significantly higher depression [t (196.28) = − 2.03, p = .043] and social anxiety symptoms [t (286) = − 2.07, p = .04] during their lab visit than those who declined participation.
 
3
The other emotion regulation strategies assessed were acceptance, behavioral avoidance, distraction, procrastination, reflection, savoring, social support, and substance use. We did not assess interactions of reappraisal with all available maladaptive responses to emotions due to concerns about inflated Type I error rates in this relatively small sample with exploratory analyses. Rather, we selected three maladaptive responses a priori that are most frequently studied and show consistent, strong associations with psychopathology.
 
4
For all models, we also ran analyses including gender and ethnicity as covariates. Including these variables did not substantively change the main results, so we present the results from the more parsimonious models excluding demographic covariates.
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Barlow, D. H., Farchione, T. J., Fairholme, C. P., Ellard, K. K., Boisseau, C. L., Allen, L. B., & Ehrenreich-May, J. (2011). The unified protocol for the transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders. New York: Oxford University Press. Barlow, D. H., Farchione, T. J., Fairholme, C. P., Ellard, K. K., Boisseau, C. L., Allen, L. B., & Ehrenreich-May, J. (2011). The unified protocol for the transdiagnostic treatment of emotional disorders. New York: Oxford University Press.
go back to reference Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford. Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York: Guilford.
go back to reference Brans, K., & Verduyn, P. (2014). Comparing determinants of emotion intensity and duration: Appraisals and regulation strategies. PLOS ONE, 9, 1–13.CrossRef Brans, K., & Verduyn, P. (2014). Comparing determinants of emotion intensity and duration: Appraisals and regulation strategies. PLOS ONE, 9, 1–13.CrossRef
go back to reference Brozovich, F. A., Goldin, P., Lee, I., Jazaieri, H., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2015). The effect of rumination and reappraisal on social anxiety symptoms during cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 71(3), 208–218. https://doi.org/10.1002/jclp.22132.CrossRefPubMed Brozovich, F. A., Goldin, P., Lee, I., Jazaieri, H., Heimberg, R. G., & Gross, J. J. (2015). The effect of rumination and reappraisal on social anxiety symptoms during cognitive-behavioral therapy for social anxiety disorder. Journal of Clinical Psychology, 71(3), 208–218. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1002/​jclp.​22132.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., & Wilson, K. G. (1999). Acceptance and commitment therapy: An experiential approach to behavior change. New York: Guilford. Hayes, S. C., Strosahl, K. D., & Wilson, K. G. (1999). Acceptance and commitment therapy: An experiential approach to behavior change. New York: Guilford.
go back to reference Kashdan, T. B., Goodman, F. R., Machell, K. A., Kleiman, E. M., Monfort, S. S., Ciarrochi, J., & Nezlek, J. B. (2014). A contextual approach to experiential avoidance and social anxiety: Evidence from an experimental interaction and daily interactions of people with social anxiety disorder. Emotion, 14(4), 769–781. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0035935.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Kashdan, T. B., Goodman, F. R., Machell, K. A., Kleiman, E. M., Monfort, S. S., Ciarrochi, J., & Nezlek, J. B. (2014). A contextual approach to experiential avoidance and social anxiety: Evidence from an experimental interaction and daily interactions of people with social anxiety disorder. Emotion, 14(4), 769–781. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1037/​a0035935.CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
go back to reference Li, Y. I., Starr, L. R., & Hershenberg, R. (2017). Responses to positive affect in daily life: Positive rumination and dampening moderate the association between daily events and depressive symptoms. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 39(3), 412–425. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-017-9593-y.CrossRef Li, Y. I., Starr, L. R., & Hershenberg, R. (2017). Responses to positive affect in daily life: Positive rumination and dampening moderate the association between daily events and depressive symptoms. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 39(3), 412–425. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10862-017-9593-y.CrossRef
go back to reference Muthén, L. K., & Muthén, B. O. (1998–2017). Mplus user’s guide (7th ed.). Los Angeles: Muthén & Muthén. Muthén, L. K., & Muthén, B. O. (1998–2017). Mplus user’s guide (7th ed.). Los Angeles: Muthén & Muthén.
go back to reference Pavani, J., Le Vigouroux, S., Kop, J., Congard, A., & Dauvier, B. (2016). Affect and affect regulation strategies reciprocally influence each other in daily life: The case of positive reappraisal, problem-focused coping, appreciation and rumination. Journal of Happiness Studies, 17(5), 2077–2095. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10902-015-9686-9.CrossRef Pavani, J., Le Vigouroux, S., Kop, J., Congard, A., & Dauvier, B. (2016). Affect and affect regulation strategies reciprocally influence each other in daily life: The case of positive reappraisal, problem-focused coping, appreciation and rumination. Journal of Happiness Studies, 17(5), 2077–2095. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10902-015-9686-9.CrossRef
go back to reference Plate, A. J., Aldao, A., Quintero, J. M., & Mennin, D. S. (2016). Interactions between reappraisal and emotional nonacceptance in psychopathology: Examining disability and depression symptoms in generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 40(6), 733–746. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-016-9793-x.CrossRef Plate, A. J., Aldao, A., Quintero, J. M., & Mennin, D. S. (2016). Interactions between reappraisal and emotional nonacceptance in psychopathology: Examining disability and depression symptoms in generalized anxiety disorder. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 40(6), 733–746. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1007/​s10608-016-9793-x.CrossRef
go back to reference Watson, D., O’Hara, M. W., Chmielewski, M., McDade-Montez, E. A., Koffel, E., Naragon, K., & Stuart, S. (2008). Further validation of the IDAS: Evidence of convergent, discriminant, criterion, and incremental validity. Psychological Assessment, 20(3), 248–259. https://doi.org/10.1037/a0012570.CrossRefPubMed Watson, D., O’Hara, M. W., Chmielewski, M., McDade-Montez, E. A., Koffel, E., Naragon, K., & Stuart, S. (2008). Further validation of the IDAS: Evidence of convergent, discriminant, criterion, and incremental validity. Psychological Assessment, 20(3), 248–259. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1037/​a0012570.CrossRefPubMed
Metagegevens
Titel
The Moderating Effect of Maladaptive Emotion Regulation Strategies on Reappraisal: A Daily Diary Study
Auteurs
Tierney P. McMahon
Kristin Naragon-Gainey
Publicatiedatum
19-04-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 5/2018
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-018-9913-x

Andere artikelen Uitgave 5/2018

Cognitive Therapy and Research 5/2018 Naar de uitgave