Skip to main content
Top
Gepubliceerd in:

26-09-2018 | Original Article

Stripping #The Dress: the importance of contextual information on inter-individual differences in colour perception

Auteurs: Domicele Jonauskaite, Nele Dael, C. Alejandro Parraga, Laetitia Chèvre, Alejandro García Sánchez, Christine Mohr

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 4/2020

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

In 2015, a picture of a Dress (henceforth the Dress) triggered popular and scientific interest; some reported seeing the Dress in white and gold (W&G) and others in blue and black (B&B). We aimed to describe the phenomenon and investigate the role of contextualization. Few days after the Dress had appeared on the Internet, we projected it to 240 students on two large screens in the classroom. Participants reported seeing the Dress in B&B (48%), W&G (38%), or blue and brown (B&Br; 7%). Amongst numerous socio-demographic variables, we only observed that W&G viewers were most likely to have always seen the Dress as W&G. In the laboratory, we tested how much contextual information is necessary for the phenomenon to occur. Fifty-seven participants selected colours most precisely matching predominant colours of parts or the full Dress. We presented, in this order, small squares (a), vertical strips (b), and the full Dress (c). We found that (1) B&B, B&Br, and W&G viewers had selected colours differing in lightness and chroma levels for contextualized images only (b, c conditions) and hue for fully contextualized condition only (c) and (2) B&B viewers selected colours most closely matching displayed colours of the Dress. Thus, the Dress phenomenon emerges due to inter-individual differences in subjectively perceived lightness, chroma, and hue, at least when all aspects of the picture need to be integrated. Our results support the previous conclusions that contextual information is key to colour perception; it should be important to understand how this actually happens.
Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Literatuur
go back to reference Bergsma, W. P., Croon, M. A., & Hagenaars, J. A. (2009). Marginal models: For dependent, clustered, and longitudinal categorical data. Berlin: Springer. Bergsma, W. P., Croon, M. A., & Hagenaars, J. A. (2009). Marginal models: For dependent, clustered, and longitudinal categorical data. Berlin: Springer.
go back to reference Bergsma, W. P., & Van der Ark, L. A. (2015). CMM: Categorical marginal models. R package version 0.8. Bergsma, W. P., & Van der Ark, L. A. (2015). CMM: Categorical marginal models. R package version 0.8.
go back to reference Hunt, R. W. G., & Pointer, M. R. (2011). Colour order systems. In R. W. G. Hunt & M. R. Pointer (Eds.), Measuring colour (Fourth ed., pp. 155–195). John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Hunt, R. W. G., & Pointer, M. R. (2011). Colour order systems. In R. W. G. Hunt & M. R. Pointer (Eds.), Measuring colour (Fourth ed., pp. 155–195). John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.
go back to reference IBM Corp. (2013). IBM SPSS statistics for Macintosh. Armonk: IBM Corp. IBM Corp. (2013). IBM SPSS statistics for Macintosh. Armonk: IBM Corp.
go back to reference Ishihara, S. (1993). Album-test pour la recherche des dyschromatopsies congenitales, 38 plates edn. [Ishihara’s Test for Colour Deficiency: 38 Plates Edition]. Tokyo: Kanehara. (Original work published 1917). Ishihara, S. (1993). Album-test pour la recherche des dyschromatopsies congenitales, 38 plates edn. [Ishihara’s Test for Colour Deficiency: 38 Plates Edition]. Tokyo: Kanehara. (Original work published 1917).
go back to reference Mahroo, O. A., Williams, K. M., Hossain, I. T., Yonova-Doing, E., Kozareva, D., Yusuf, A., et al. (2017). Do twins share the same dress code? Quantifying relative genetic and environmental contributions to subjective perceptions of “the dress” in a classical twin study. Journal of Vision, 17(1), 1–7. https://doi.org/10.1167/17.1.29.CrossRef Mahroo, O. A., Williams, K. M., Hossain, I. T., Yonova-Doing, E., Kozareva, D., Yusuf, A., et al. (2017). Do twins share the same dress code? Quantifying relative genetic and environmental contributions to subjective perceptions of “the dress” in a classical twin study. Journal of Vision, 17(1), 1–7. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1167/​17.​1.​29.CrossRef
go back to reference Robson, T. (1999). Topics in computerized visual-stimulus generation. In R. H. S. Carpenter & J. G. Robson (Eds.), Vision research: A practical guide to laboratory methods (pp. 81–105). Oxford: Oxford University Press. Robson, T. (1999). Topics in computerized visual-stimulus generation. In R. H. S. Carpenter & J. G. Robson (Eds.), Vision research: A practical guide to laboratory methods (pp. 81–105). Oxford: Oxford University Press.
Metagegevens
Titel
Stripping #The Dress: the importance of contextual information on inter-individual differences in colour perception
Auteurs
Domicele Jonauskaite
Nele Dael
C. Alejandro Parraga
Laetitia Chèvre
Alejandro García Sánchez
Christine Mohr
Publicatiedatum
26-09-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 4/2020
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-018-1097-1

Andere artikelen Uitgave 4/2020

Psychological Research 4/2020 Naar de uitgave