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07-03-2022

Self-Imagery and Attentional Control Maintenance Factors of Social Anxiety: A Comparison of Trait and State Assessments

Auteurs: Danielle E. Deros, DeMond M. Grant, Jacob D. Kraft, Kaitlyn M. Nagel, Burkhart J. Hahn

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment | Uitgave 2/2022

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Abstract

Models of social anxiety (SA) posit that socially-evaluative fears may be maintained by biased cognitive processes such as attention and self-imagery. However, extant literature has yielded inconsistent data regarding the differential roles that self-imagery plays in SA, as well as high and low attentional control (AC) abilities. These inconsistencies may be in part a result of differences in trait and state methodologies used to assess self-imagery. The present study provides a comparison of trait and state assessments of self-imagery between groups of individuals with high and low SA and AC. After completing self-report measures of social anxiety, attentional control, and trait self-imagery, 96 participants engaged in negative, positive, and neutral audio manipulations to evoke state self-imagery. Subsequently, participants responded to items regarding the extent to which and how they engaged with these self-imagery scenarios. Trait self-imagery results indicated that those with lower AC reported more anxiety-provoking and negative self-imagery, whereas those with higher SA engaged in more aversive, anxiety-provoking, and negative self-imagery. Those with greater AC accompanied with high SA reported more aversive self-images. Conversely, state self-imagery results indicated that valence of self-images affects different characteristics of self-images themselves (i.e., negatively-valenced self-images are more aversive, anxiety-provoking, negative, less accessible, and elicit greater urges to avoid in engagement) rather than serving as a distinguishing factor for SA or AC. Given these differential effects, trait assessment may reveal important characteristics of self-imagery that perpetuate SA, and state assessment may not measure the same mechanisms.
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Self-Imagery and Attentional Control Maintenance Factors of Social Anxiety: A Comparison of Trait and State Assessments
Auteurs
Danielle E. Deros
DeMond M. Grant
Jacob D. Kraft
Kaitlyn M. Nagel
Burkhart J. Hahn
Publicatiedatum
07-03-2022
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment / Uitgave 2/2022
Print ISSN: 0882-2689
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3505
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10862-021-09924-w

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