Skip to main content
main-content

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

01-04-2011 | Uitgave 2/2011

Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2/2011

Religious coping and hospital admissions among adults with sickle cell disease

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Behavioral Medicine > Uitgave 2/2011
Auteurs:
Shawn M. Bediako, Lakshmi Lattimer, Carlton Haywood Jr, Neda Ratanawongsa, Sophie Lanzkron, Mary Catherine Beach

Abstract

Although a well-established literature implicates religiosity as a central element of the African American experience, little is known about how individuals from this group utilize religion to cope with specific health-related stressors. The present study examined the relation between religious coping and hospital admissions among a cohort of 95 adults with sickle cell disease—a genetic blood disorder that, in the United States, primarily affects people of African ancestry. Multiple regression analyses indicated that positive religious coping uniquely accounted for variance in hospital admissions after adjusting for other demographic and diagnostic variables. Specifically, greater endorsement of positive religious coping was associated with significantly fewer hospital admissions (β = −.29, P < .05). These results indicate a need for further investigation of the roles that religion and spirituality play in adjustment to sickle cell disease and their influence on health care utilization patterns and health outcomes.

Log in om toegang te krijgen

Met onderstaand(e) abonnement(en) heeft u direct toegang:

BSL Psychologie Totaal

Met BSL houdt u eenvoudig en efficiënt uw vak bij. Met een online abonnement heeft u toegang tot een groot aantal boeken, tijdschriften en online nascholing. Denk hierbij aan e-learnings en web-tv's. Zo kunt u op uw gemak en wanneer het u het beste uitkomt verdiepen in uw vakgebied.

Literatuur
Over dit artikel

Andere artikelen Uitgave 2/2011

Journal of Behavioral Medicine 2/2011Naar de uitgave