Skip to main content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness 5/2018

30-01-2018 | ORIGINAL PAPER

Relating Mindfulness to Attitudinal Ambivalence Through Self-concept Clarity

Auteur: Sebastian Dummel

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 5/2018

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Attitudinal ambivalence is characterized by conflict and indecision. Individuals differ in the extent to which they hold ambivalent attitudes, and this has recently been shown to be associated with mindfulness. Specifically, higher mindfulness was related to lower levels of ambivalence. The current study examined whether this relationship would be mediated by the clarity that individuals have about themselves (self-concept clarity, SCC). A close relationship between the self and attitudes has been documented in previous research, and the current study hypothesized (a) that high SCC would be associated with less attitudinal ambivalence and (b) that this association might account for the relationship between mindfulness and ambivalence. Participants of the current study (N = 114) completed measures of mindfulness and SCC as well as an attitude survey asking them about various contentious issues (e.g., euthanasia). Results of linear mixed-effects model analyses showed that both higher mindfulness and higher SCC were associated with lower levels of attitudinal ambivalence. Moreover, bootstrapping mediation analyses showed that SCC mediated the association between mindfulness and ambivalence. Results suggest that mindfulness may foster self-knowledge and that clear self-knowledge may shield individuals from feeling too much conflict and indecision about various contentious issues.
Literatuur
go back to reference Campbell, J. D., Trapnell, P. D., Heine, S. J., Katz, I. M., Lavallee, L. E., & Lehman, D. R. (1996). Self-concept clarity: measurement, personality correlates, and cultural boundaries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychologysychology, 70(I), 141–156. CrossRef Campbell, J. D., Trapnell, P. D., Heine, S. J., Katz, I. M., Lavallee, L. E., & Lehman, D. R. (1996). Self-concept clarity: measurement, personality correlates, and cultural boundaries. Journal of Personality and Social Psychologysychology, 70(I), 141–156. CrossRef
go back to reference Carlson, E. N. (2013). Overcoming barriers to self-knowledge: mindfulness as a path to seeing yourself as you really are. Perspective on Psychological Science, 8, 173–186. CrossRef Carlson, E. N. (2013). Overcoming barriers to self-knowledge: mindfulness as a path to seeing yourself as you really are. Perspective on Psychological Science, 8, 173–186. CrossRef
go back to reference Conway, M. A., Singer, J. A., & Tagini, A. (2004). The self and autobiographical memory: correspondence and coherence. Social Cognition, 22(5), 491–529. CrossRef Conway, M. A., Singer, J. A., & Tagini, A. (2004). The self and autobiographical memory: correspondence and coherence. Social Cognition, 22(5), 491–529. CrossRef
go back to reference Crane, C., Barnhofer, T., Duggan, D., Hepburn, S., Fennle, M. V., & Williams, J. M. G. (2008). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and self-discrepancy in recovered depressed patients with a history of depression and suicidality. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 32, 775–787. CrossRef Crane, C., Barnhofer, T., Duggan, D., Hepburn, S., Fennle, M. V., & Williams, J. M. G. (2008). Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy and self-discrepancy in recovered depressed patients with a history of depression and suicidality. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 32, 775–787. CrossRef
go back to reference Herek, M. G. (1987). Can functions be measured? A new perspective on the functional approach to attitudes. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50(4), 285–303. CrossRef Herek, M. G. (1987). Can functions be measured? A new perspective on the functional approach to attitudes. Social Psychology Quarterly, 50(4), 285–303. CrossRef
go back to reference Priester, J. R., & Petty, R. E. (1996). The gradual threshold model of ambivalence: relating the positive and negative bases of attitudes to subjective ambivalence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(3), 431–449. CrossRefPubMed Priester, J. R., & Petty, R. E. (1996). The gradual threshold model of ambivalence: relating the positive and negative bases of attitudes to subjective ambivalence. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 71(3), 431–449. CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Thompson, M. M., Zanna, M. P., & Griffin, D. W. (1995). Let’s not be indifferent about (attitudinal) ambivalence. In R. E. Petty & J. A. Krosnick (Eds.), Attitude strength: Antecedents and consequences (pp. 361–386). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum. Thompson, M. M., Zanna, M. P., & Griffin, D. W. (1995). Let’s not be indifferent about (attitudinal) ambivalence. In R. E. Petty & J. A. Krosnick (Eds.), Attitude strength: Antecedents and consequences (pp. 361–386). Mahwah: Lawrence Erlbaum.
Metagegevens
Titel
Relating Mindfulness to Attitudinal Ambivalence Through Self-concept Clarity
Auteur
Sebastian Dummel
Publicatiedatum
30-01-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 5/2018
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-018-0894-3

Andere artikelen Uitgave 5/2018

Mindfulness 5/2018 Naar de uitgave

ORTHOGONAL ROTATION IN CONSCIOUSNESS

A Study in Healing and the Mind

MINDFULNESS IN PRACTICE

Mindfulness and Nature