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17-08-2021 | Original Article

Reconnecting in the Face of Exclusion: Individuals with High Social Anxiety May Feel the Push of Social Pain, but not the Pull of Social Rewards

Auteurs: Taylor Hudd, David A. Moscovitch

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 2/2022

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Abstract

Background

Previous research has shown that high levels of trait social anxiety (SA) disrupt the social repair processes following a painful social exclusion, but the cognitive mechanisms involved in these processes and how trait SA may disrupt them remain unknown.

Methods

We conducted a preregistered study on Prolific participants (N = 452) who were assigned to experience either social exclusion or inclusion and were then exposed to follow-up opportunities for social reconnection.

Results

Moderated mediation analyses revealed that irrespective of levels of SA, participants responded to social pain with heightened approach motivation and greater downstream positive affect. Exploratory analyses revealed that heightened desire to affiliate was driven by increased curiosity and attention to social rewards. Moreover, higher SA was associated with lower overall desire to affiliate and this relationship between SA and affiliation was mediated by diminished reward responsiveness.

Conclusions

Findings highlight the roles of goal pursuit and social reward responsiveness in social repair and how high levels of trait SA may disrupt these processes.
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Voetnoten
1
Consecutive (or serial) mediation represents a causal chain, whereby predictor variable X is hypothesized to have a causal impact on mediator variable 1, which then subsequently causes an impact on mediator variable 2, and finally, mediator 2 impacts outcome variable Y (X → M1 → M2 → Y). This process differs from simultaneous (or concurrent) mediation, which implies that predictor variable X has a direct impact on 2 or more mediator variables at once, and subsequently, all mediator variables have a direct impact on outcome variable Y at once (X → M1 & M2 → Y) (Hayes, 2017).
 
2
It is worth noting that the effects of condition were not accounted for in this model. The focal predictor of this model is social pain, which (in accordance with primary hypothesis 1) is expected to vary as a function of condition. In this analysis we retained all participants across both the inclusion and exclusion conditions to allow for maximum variability in our focal predictor (social pain) by including participants who experienced lower levels of social pain (i.e., those within the inclusion condition), and to retain maximum power for detecting anticipated effects.
 
3
Our study pre-registration stated that participants would be recruited from MTurk, but due to concerns about the increasing prevalence of bot data on the MTurk platform, especially during the start of the COVID-19 pandemic when the study was preparing to launch, we opted instead to use the Prolific platform for recruitment. We discovered zero evidence of bot data in our study sample.
 
4
Prolific is an online platform that allows researchers to connect with potential research participants in exchange for remuneration.
 
Literatuur
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go back to reference Hayes, A. F. (2017). Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis: A regression-based approach. The Guilford Press. Hayes, A. F. (2017). Introduction to mediation, moderation, and conditional process analysis: A regression-based approach. The Guilford Press.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Reconnecting in the Face of Exclusion: Individuals with High Social Anxiety May Feel the Push of Social Pain, but not the Pull of Social Rewards
Auteurs
Taylor Hudd
David A. Moscovitch
Publicatiedatum
17-08-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 2/2022
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-021-10263-z

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