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Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research 1/2017

08-10-2015 | Original Article

Perceptually walking in another’s shoes: goals and memories constrain spatial perception

Auteurs: David W. Vinson, J. Scott Jordan, Alycia M. Hund

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 1/2017

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Abstract

Perceptual variables such as perceived distance contain information about future actions. Often our goals involve the integration of another’s goals, such as lifting heavy objects together. The purpose of this study was to investigate how another’s actions might influence one’s own goal-oriented perceptions (i.e., verbal distance estimates). Using a within-subject paradigm, we replicated a well-known finding that carrying a weighted backpack results in larger distance estimates relative to not carrying a backpack. In a crucial second condition, this effect was reversed: distance estimates were significantly greater when not carrying a weighted backpack than when carrying a backpack. In this condition, participants provided distance estimates while wearing a weighted backpack during the first phase and then gave estimates while not wearing a backpack, but following an experimenter wearing a weighted backpack in the second phase. Three additional conditions systematically documented how the observation of another’s actions influenced distance estimates.
Voetnoten
1
Cohen’s d for follow up tests was determined by using the mean difference score for each participant, collapsed across distances.
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Perceptually walking in another’s shoes: goals and memories constrain spatial perception
Auteurs
David W. Vinson
J. Scott Jordan
Alycia M. Hund
Publicatiedatum
08-10-2015
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 1/2017
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-015-0714-5

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