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2019 | OriginalPaper | Hoofdstuk

23. Pelvic floor disorders

Auteurs : Huub (C.H.) van der Vaart, Dr Pieternel Steures, Professor Jan-Paul W. R. Roovers

Gepubliceerd in: Textbook of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

Uitgeverij: Bohn Stafleu van Loghum

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Summary

The pelvic floor, consisting of muscles and connective tissue, plays a crucial role in a woman’s life. Basically, the pelvic floor has two functions. It must support the pelvic organs such as the bladder, anorectum and vagina against a rise in intra-abdominal pressure. It does so by providing basic support and contraction at appropriate moments. On the other hand, it must allow the passage of urine and faeces, and allow pain-free sexual intercourse. Life events as childbirth and menopause are likely to affect normal functioning. Dysfunction of the pelvic floor is the field of the subspecialty urogynaecology.
Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Woordenlijst
Dyspareunia
Painful sexual intercourse due to medical or psychological causes
Genital hiatus
The area between the left and right levator ani muscle through which the anorectum, vagina and urethra passes
Overactive bladder syndrome
Urgency, with or without frequency, nocturia and urinary incontinence
Stress urinary incontinence
Involuntary loss of urine during a rise in intra-abdominal pressure, such as laughing, coughing or physical exercise
Urgency urinary incontinence
Involuntary loss of urine associated with a sudden strong desire to void
Literatuur
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2.
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3.
go back to reference DeLancey JOL. Pelvic floor anatomy and pathology, chap. 2, pp. 13–51. In: Hoyte L, Damaser M, editors. Biomechanics of the female pelvic floor. Elsevier 2016. ISBN: 978-0-12-803228-2. DeLancey JOL. Pelvic floor anatomy and pathology, chap. 2, pp. 13–51. In: Hoyte L, Damaser M, editors. Biomechanics of the female pelvic floor. Elsevier 2016. ISBN: 978-0-12-803228-2.
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go back to reference Lucs MG, Bosch JL, Burkhard FC. EAU guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence. Eur Urol. 2012b;61:1130–42. CrossRef Lucs MG, Bosch JL, Burkhard FC. EAU guidelines on assessment and nonsurgical management of urinary incontinence. Eur Urol. 2012b;61:1130–42. CrossRef
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go back to reference Whitehead, et al. Treatment of fecal incontinence: state of the science summary for the national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases workshop. Am J Gastroenterol. 2015:110–138. Whitehead, et al. Treatment of fecal incontinence: state of the science summary for the national institute of diabetes and digestive and kidney diseases workshop. Am J Gastroenterol. 2015:110–138.
Metagegevens
Titel
Pelvic floor disorders
Auteurs
Huub (C.H.) van der Vaart
Dr Pieternel Steures
Professor Jan-Paul W. R. Roovers
Copyright
2019
Uitgeverij
Bohn Stafleu van Loghum
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/978-90-368-2131-5_23