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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence 3/2019

17-12-2018 | Empirical Research

Parental Social Support and Sources of Knowledge Interact to Predict Children’s Externalizing Behavior Over Time

Auteurs: Lauren Micalizzi, Alexander W. Sokolovsky, Tim Janssen, Kristina M. Jackson

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence | Uitgave 3/2019

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Abstract

Parental social support and monitoring are associated with children’s externalizing behavior but clarity is needed on how these mechanisms interact to influence youth. This study examined if parental social support magnifies the protective effects of sources of parental knowledge (Parental Control, Parental Solicitation, Child Disclosure) on the development of substance initiation and delinquency across adolescence. Participants were 6–8th graders (N = 1023; 52% female; 83% White; 87.8% non-Hispanic) from six (one urban, two rural, three suburban) Rhode Island schools assessed annually for four years. Parental control protected against substance initiation, but only in supportive relationships. All sources of parental knowledge were associated with less delinquency, but only in supportive relationships. Interventions focused on increasing children’s perceptions of parental social support may enhance the effectiveness of sources of parental knowledge in buffering against children’s externalizing behavior.
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Parental Social Support and Sources of Knowledge Interact to Predict Children’s Externalizing Behavior Over Time
Auteurs
Lauren Micalizzi
Alexander W. Sokolovsky
Tim Janssen
Kristina M. Jackson
Publicatiedatum
17-12-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Youth and Adolescence / Uitgave 3/2019
Print ISSN: 0047-2891
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-6601
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-018-0969-4