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Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research 6/2010

01-08-2010

Needs assessments can identify scores on HRQOL questionnaires that represent problems for patients: an illustration with the Supportive Care Needs Survey and the QLQ-C30

Auteurs: Claire F. Snyder, Amanda L. Blackford, Julie R. Brahmer, Michael A. Carducci, Roberto Pili, Vered Stearns, Antonio C. Wolff, Sydney M. Dy, Albert W. Wu

Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research | Uitgave 6/2010

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Abstract

Purpose

A barrier to using HRQOL questionnaires for individual patient management is knowing what score represents a problem deserving attention. We explored using needs assessments to identify HRQOL scores associated with patient-reported unmet needs.

Methods

This cross-sectional study included 117 cancer patients (mean age 61 years; 51% men; 77% white) who completed the Supportive Care Needs Survey (SCNS) and EORTC QLQ-C30. SCNS scores were dichotomized as “no unmet need” versus “some unmet need” and served as an external criterion for identifying problem scores. We evaluated the discriminative ability of QLQ-C30 scores using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis. Domains with an area under the ROC curve (AUC) ≥ .70 were examined further to determine how well QLQ-C30 scores predicted presence/absence of unmet need.

Results

We found AUCs ≥ .70 for 6 of 14 EORTC domains: physical, emotional, role, global QOL, pain, fatigue. All 6 domains had sensitivity ≥ .85 and specificity ≥ .50. EORTC domains that closely matched the content of SCNS item(s) were more likely to have AUCs ≥ .70. The appropriate cut-off depends on the relative importance of false positives and false negatives.

Conclusions

Needs assessments can identify HRQOL scores requiring clinicians’ attention. Future research should confirm these findings using other HRQOL questionnaires and needs assessments.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Needs assessments can identify scores on HRQOL questionnaires that represent problems for patients: an illustration with the Supportive Care Needs Survey and the QLQ-C30
Auteurs
Claire F. Snyder
Amanda L. Blackford
Julie R. Brahmer
Michael A. Carducci
Roberto Pili
Vered Stearns
Antonio C. Wolff
Sydney M. Dy
Albert W. Wu
Publicatiedatum
01-08-2010
Uitgeverij
Springer Netherlands
Gepubliceerd in
Quality of Life Research / Uitgave 6/2010
Print ISSN: 0962-9343
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2649
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-010-9636-2

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