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05-03-2022 | Original Article

Muscle activity prior to experiencing the rubber hand illusion is associated with alterations in perceived hand location

Auteurs: Max Teaford, William Berg, Vincent A. Billock, Matthew S. McMurray, Robin Thomas, L. James Smart

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research

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Abstract

The rubber hand illusion (RHI) is a perceptual illusion in which one is made to feel that a hand-shaped object is part of their body. This illusion is believed to be the result of the integration of afferent information. However, there has been an increasing amount of evidence that suggests efferent information plays a role in this illusion as well. Previous research has found that individuals who are afflicted by pathological lack of movement experience the RHI more vividly than control participants. Whereas individuals who move their hands more than the general population (i.e. professional pianists) experience the RHI less vividly than control participants. Based upon the available evidence it would seem that muscle activity prior to experiencing the RHI should be associated with how vividly one experiences different indices of the illusion. In the present study we tested this possibility by having participants perform a maximum voluntary muscle contraction task prior to experiencing three variants of the RHI (moving active, moving passive and classic). It was found that electromyographic features known to be indicative of muscle fatigue exhibited a positive association with proprioceptive drift when stimulation was synchronous or visual movement only (with the exception of the passive moving RHI synchronous condition). More work is needed to better characterize the muscular processes associated with experiencing the RHI.
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Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Voetnoten
1
Active and passive variants of the mRHI were included to see if the MVC task had different effects on volitional and non-volitional movements.
 
2
Prior to performing the study an a priori power analysis was performed using G*Power (version 3.1.9.7; Faul et al., 2009). To estimate the minimum sample size needed the authors computed partial eta squared (0.073) from della Gatta’s (2016) normalized motor evoked potential data. A minimum sample size of 15 was indicated.
 
3
Thumb-middle finger opposition was chosen because it was found to produce a stronger signal during the planning stages of the study.
 
4
It should be noted that questionnaires were completed between the MVC task and RHI in order to give the experimenter time to clear off the equipment from the MVC task (which could potentially be distracting to the participant while they were experiencing the RHI).
 
5
Three participants, all of whom experienced synchronous stimulation before the visual movement only condition, exhibited involuntary finger movements that occurred slightly after the rubber hand moved. All were asked after the trial if the movements were volitional and to describe them. One participant described experiencing an electrical shock sensation in their arm while it happened. Another described it as feeling like their hand was being controlled (the exact term they used was “parasite-ing”). The third participant was unaware of the movement. This phenomenon bears a striking resemblance to the findings of Shibuya et al. (2018) and Teaford et al. (2021b).
 
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Muscle activity prior to experiencing the rubber hand illusion is associated with alterations in perceived hand location
Auteurs
Max Teaford
William Berg
Vincent A. Billock
Matthew S. McMurray
Robin Thomas
L. James Smart
Publicatiedatum
05-03-2022
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-022-01665-z