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05-08-2016

Mortality risk and perceived quality of life as a function of waking time in discretionary movement-based behaviors: isotemporal substitution effects

Auteurs: Paul D. Loprinzi, Jeremy P. Loenneke

Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research | Uitgave 2/2017

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Abstract

Objective

Previous research has examined associations of sedentary behavior (SB), light-intensity physical activity (LIPA) and moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA) with health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and mortality. However, most of these studies have been limited to examining their potential “independent” effects, as opposed to whether mortality risk and HRQOL vary as a function of waking time in these discretionary movement-related behaviors, which was this study’s purpose.

Methods

Data from the 2003–2006 NHANES were employed, with follow-up mortality assessed through 2011 (5377 adults 20–85 years). HRQOL was assessed via survey, with physical activity assessed using an accelerometer over a 7-day monitoring period. Isotemporal substitution analyses were employed.

Results

Participants engaged in little MVPA during their monitored waking time and higher mortality risk appeared to cluster more so among those spending a greater proportion of their day in SB with less LIPA engagement. Substituting 30 min/day of SB with MVPA would be expected to reduce mortality risk by 81 % (HRadjusted = 0.19; 95 % CI: 0.06–0.60; P = 0.006) and reduce worse HRQOL by 72 % (OR = 0.28; 95 % CI: 0.13–0.58; P = 0.001).

Conclusions

Allocation of waking time in movement-based behaviors is associated with all-cause mortality and HRQOL. Thus, clinicians should encourage their patients to substitute SB with reasonable amounts of LIPA and MVPA.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Mortality risk and perceived quality of life as a function of waking time in discretionary movement-based behaviors: isotemporal substitution effects
Auteurs
Paul D. Loprinzi
Jeremy P. Loenneke
Publicatiedatum
05-08-2016
Uitgeverij
Springer International Publishing
Gepubliceerd in
Quality of Life Research / Uitgave 2/2017
Print ISSN: 0962-9343
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2649
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-016-1385-4

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