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Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research 10/2019

17-09-2019 | Responses to "Advancing quality‑of‑life research by deepening our understanding of response shift" by Bruce D. Rapkin & Carolyn E. Schwartz

Measurement of appraisal is a valuable adjunct to the current spine outcome tools: a clinician’s perspective on the Rapkin and Schwartz commentary

Auteur: Joel A. Finkelstein

Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research | Uitgave 10/2019

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Excerpt

I have read with interest the commentary by Bruce Rapkin and Carolyn Schwartz, “Advancing quality-of-life research by deepening our understanding of response shift: A unifying theory of appraisal” [ 1]. These authors have identified the teleological assumption that there can be no quality-of-life (QOL) measurement and no patient-reported outcomes without some sort of cognitive appraisal going on. The QOL Appraisal Model by Rapkin and Schwartz [ 2] has built on the original foundational model of Sprangers and Schwartz [ 3] and enables the researcher to account for a mechanism of response shift at the individual level. The hard work now begins and putting a box around this abstraction with scientific rigor is the achievement I feel this commentary has outlined. I will speak to this from my area of clinical practice as a spine surgeon. …
Literatuur
2.
go back to reference Rapkin, B. D., & Schwartz, C. E. (2004). Toward a theoretical model of quality-of-life appraisal: Implications of findings from studies of response shift. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2(1), 14. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Rapkin, B. D., & Schwartz, C. E. (2004). Toward a theoretical model of quality-of-life appraisal: Implications of findings from studies of response shift. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2(1), 14. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
3.
go back to reference Sprangers, M. A. G., & Schwartz, C. E. (1999). Integrating response shift into health-related quality of life research: A theoretical model. Social Science and Medicine, 48(11), 1507–1515. CrossRefPubMed Sprangers, M. A. G., & Schwartz, C. E. (1999). Integrating response shift into health-related quality of life research: A theoretical model. Social Science and Medicine, 48(11), 1507–1515. CrossRefPubMed
4.
go back to reference Schwartz, C. E., Ayandeh, A., & Finkelstein, J. A. (2015). When patients and surgeons disagree about surgical outcome: Investigating patient factors and chart note communication. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 13(1), 161. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral Schwartz, C. E., Ayandeh, A., & Finkelstein, J. A. (2015). When patients and surgeons disagree about surgical outcome: Investigating patient factors and chart note communication. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 13(1), 161. CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentral
Metagegevens
Titel
Measurement of appraisal is a valuable adjunct to the current spine outcome tools: a clinician’s perspective on the Rapkin and Schwartz commentary
Auteur
Joel A. Finkelstein
Publicatiedatum
17-09-2019
Uitgeverij
Springer International Publishing
Gepubliceerd in
Quality of Life Research / Uitgave 10/2019
Print ISSN: 0962-9343
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2649
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-019-02275-w