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03-08-2017 | Uitgave 4/2018

Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology 4/2018

Looming Threats and Animacy: Reduced Responsiveness in Youth with Disrupted Behavior Disorders

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology > Uitgave 4/2018
Auteurs:
Stuart F. White, Laura C. Thornton, Joseph Leshin, Roberta Clanton, Stephen Sinclair, Dionne Coker-Appiah, Harma Meffert, Soonjo Hwang, James R. Blair
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Electronic supplementary material

The online version of this article (doi:10.​1007/​s10802-017-0335-0) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users.

Abstract

Theoretical models have implicated amygdala dysfunction in the development of Disruptive Behavior Disorders (DBDs; Conduct Disorder/Oppositional Defiant Disorder). Amygdala dysfunction impacts valence evaluation/response selection and emotion attention in youth with DBDs, particularly in those with elevated callous-unemotional (CU) traits. However, amygdala responsiveness during social cognition and the responsiveness of the acute threat circuitry (amygdala/periaqueductal gray) in youth with DBDs have been less well-examined, particularly with reference to CU traits. 31 youth with DBDs and 27 typically developing youth (IQ, age and gender-matched) completed a threat paradigm during fMRI where animate and inanimate, threatening and neutral stimuli appeared to loom towards or recede from participants. Reduced responsiveness to threat variables, including visual threats and encroaching stimuli, was observed within acute threat circuitry and temporal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices in youth with DBDs. This reduced responsiveness, at least with respect to the looming variable, was modulated by CU traits. Reduced responsiveness to animacy information was also observed within temporal, lateral frontal and parietal cortices, but not within amygdala. Reduced responsiveness to animacy information as a function of CU traits was observed in PCC, though not within the amygdala. Reduced threat responsiveness may contribute to risk taking and impulsivity in youth with DBDs, particularly those with high levels of CU traits. Future work will need to examine the degree to which this reduced response to animacy is independent of amygdala dysfunction in youth with DBDs and what role PCC might play in the dysfunctional social cognition observed in youth with high levels of CU traits.

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10802_2017_335_MOESM1_ESM.docx
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