Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

28-09-2016 | Empirical Research | Uitgave 5/2017

Journal of Youth and Adolescence 5/2017

Longitudinal Relations between Beliefs Supporting Aggression,Anger Regulation, and Dating Aggression among Early Adolescents

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Youth and Adolescence > Uitgave 5/2017
Auteurs:
Terri N. Sullivan, Rachel C. Garthe, Elizabeth A. Goncy, Megan M. Carlson, Kathryn L. Behrhorst
Belangrijke opmerkingen

Authors’ Contributions

TS conceived of the study and it design, conducted statistical analyses, and drafted the manuscript; RG participated in the statistical analyses and helped to draft and revise the manuscript. EG participated in the study design, statistical analyses, and helped to revise the manuscript. MC and KB helped to draft and revise the manuscript. All authors have given approval for this version to be published.

Abstract

Dating aggression occurs frequently in early to mid-adolescence and has negative repercussions for psychosocial adjustment and physical health. The patterns of behavior learned during this developmental timeframe may persist in future dating relationships, underscoring the need to identify risk factors for this outcome. The current study examined longitudinal relations between beliefs supporting aggression, anger regulation, and dating aggression. Participants were 176 middle school students in sixth, seventh, and eighth grade (50 % female; 82 % African American). No direct effects were found between beliefs supporting reactive or proactive aggression and dating aggression. Beliefs supporting reactive aggression predicted increased rates of anger dysregulation, and beliefs supporting proactive aggression led to subsequent increases in anger inhibition. Anger dysregulation and inhibition were associated with higher frequencies of dating aggression. An indirect effect was found for the relation between beliefs supporting reactive aggression and dating aggression via anger dysregulation. Another indirect effect emerged for the relation between beliefs supporting proactive aggression and dating aggression through anger inhibition. The study’s findings suggested that beliefs supporting proactive and reactive aggression were differentially related to emotion regulation processes, and identified anger dysregulation and inhibition as risk factors for dating aggression among adolescents.

Log in om toegang te krijgen

Met onderstaand(e) abonnement(en) heeft u direct toegang:

BSL Psychologie Totaal

Met BSL Psychologie Totaal blijft u als professional steeds op de hoogte van de nieuwste ontwikkelingen binnen uw vak. Met het online abonnement heeft u toegang tot een groot aantal boeken, protocollen, vaktijdschriften en e-learnings op het gebied van psychologie en psychiatrie. Zo kunt u op uw gemak en wanneer het u het beste uitkomt verdiepen in uw vakgebied.

Literatuur
Over dit artikel

Andere artikelen Uitgave 5/2017

Journal of Youth and Adolescence 5/2017 Naar de uitgave