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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 4/2012

01-04-2012 | Original Paper

IQ Predicts Biological Motion Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders

Auteurs: M. D. Rutherford, Nikolaus F. Troje

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders | Uitgave 4/2012

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Abstract

Biological motion is easily perceived by neurotypical observers when encoded in point-light displays. Some but not all relevant research shows significant deficits in biological motion perception among those with ASD, especially with respect to emotional displays. We tested adults with and without ASD on the perception of masked biological motion and the perception of direction from coherent and scrambled biological motion. Within the autism spectrum group, there was a large and statistically significant relationship between IQ and the ability to perceive directionality in masked biological motion. There were no group differences in sensitivity to biological motion or the ability to identify the direction of motion. Possible explanations are discussed, including the possible use of compensatory strategies in high IQ ASD.
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Metagegevens
Titel
IQ Predicts Biological Motion Perception in Autism Spectrum Disorders
Auteurs
M. D. Rutherford
Nikolaus F. Troje
Publicatiedatum
01-04-2012
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders / Uitgave 4/2012
Print ISSN: 0162-3257
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3432
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-011-1267-0