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Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research 4/2021

04-05-2020 | Original Article

Inhibitory mechanisms in motor imagery: disentangling different forms of inhibition using action mode switching

Auteurs: Victoria K. E. Bart, Iring Koch, Martina Rieger

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 4/2021

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Abstract

In motor imagery, probably several inhibitory mechanisms prevent actual movements: global inhibition, effector-specific inhibition, and inhibition retrieved during target processing. We investigated factors that may influence those mechanisms. In an action mode switching paradigm, participants imagined and executed movements from home buttons to target buttons. We analysed sequential effects. Activation (due to execution) or inhibition (due to imagination) in the previous trial should affect performance in the subsequent trial, enabling conclusions about inhibitory mechanisms in motor imagery. In Experiment 1, evidence for global and effector-specific inhibition was observed. Evidence for inhibition retrieved during target processing was inconclusive. Data patterns were similar when start and end of the imagined movements were indicated with an effector that was part of the imagined movement (hand) and with a different effector (feet). In Experiment 2, we ruled out that the use of biological stimuli (left/right hands in Experiment 1) to indicate the effector causes sequential effects attributed to effector-specific inhibition, by using uppercase letters (R, L). As in Experiment 1, evidence for effector-specific inhibition was observed. In conclusion, we could reliably disentangle several inhibitory mechanisms in motor imagery.

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1
In execution trials of the foot group we have data from the release and press of the foot buttons and from the release and press of the home buttons. We compared the data from foot buttons and home buttons for RTs and MTs. No significant differences between the data from foot buttons and home buttons were observed. In imagination trials of the foot group the home buttons were not released. Thus, we used the data from foot buttons to calculate RTs and MTs in all conditions to ensure comparability between imagination and execution.
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Inhibitory mechanisms in motor imagery: disentangling different forms of inhibition using action mode switching
Auteurs
Victoria K. E. Bart
Iring Koch
Martina Rieger
Publicatiedatum
04-05-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 4/2021
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-020-01327-y