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Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research 12/2018

22-08-2018

How you live is how you feel? Positive associations between different lifestyle factors, cognitive functioning, and health-related quality of life across adulthood

Auteurs: Caroline Cohrdes, Gert B. M. Mensink, Heike Hölling

Gepubliceerd in: Quality of Life Research | Uitgave 12/2018

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Abstract

Purpose

Self-reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) represents one central indicator for the need of prevention or intervention with gaining importance for public health monitoring. As part of this framework, the present study aims to identify potentially supportive factors of HRQoL and to determine age-related differences.

Methods

In a sample of young to older adults (18–79 years; M = 52.71, SD = 16.06) from the German Health Interview and Examination Survey for Adults (DEGS1 subsample, n = 3667, 52% female), we investigated interrelations between individual (e.g., chronic condition), social (e.g., social support), and lifestyle factors (e.g., healthy eating) and executive functioning with the physical composite scale (PCS) and the mental composite scale (MCS) of HRQoL with the help of path analyses. Secondly, we performed multiple regression analyses to determine age interactions.

Results

Results suggest direct and indirect paths on PCS, respectively, MCS from various lifestyle factors and executive functioning in addition to individual and social factors with a good model fit (PCS: CD = .63, SRMR = .001; MCS: CD = .64, SRMR = .003). Furthermore, results suggest physical activity and healthy eating to become particularly relevant with advancing age (age group  ×  physical activity on PCS, β = .09, p < .05; age group × healthy eating on MCS, β > .50, p < .01).

Conclusions

Several lifestyle factors and executive functioning offer the potential to promote HRQoL in the everyday life of individuals at various ages, independent of individual or social determinants. Public health action might want to foster behavioral multicomponent approaches supporting healthy aging.
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1
We tested multicollinearity by taking the correlation between indicators and the variance inflation factor (VIF) of all indicators of the regression model into account. All values were below the conventional limits of r < .70 and VIF < 10 (e.g., [56]).
 
2
We furthermore tested for HRQoL differences between the three physical activity (none, < 2 h, > 2 h) and healthy eating categories (low, medium, high) for each age group, separately. PCS scores differed significantly regarding physical activity for young (none vs. < 2 h B = − 0.14, SE = 0.75, p = .85; none vs. > 2 h B = 1.67, SE = 0.70, p = .02), middle-aged (none vs. < 2 h B = 0.41, SE = 0.73, p = .58; none vs. > 2 h B = 2.71, SE = 0.72, p < .01) as well as older adults (none vs. < 2 h B = 2.85, SE = 0.83, p < .01; none vs. > 2 h B = 5.21, SE = 0.94, p < .01), while MCS scores did not differ significantly regarding physical activity for young (none vs. < 2 h B = 1.47, SE = 1.24, p = .24; none vs. > 2 h B = 1.96, SE = 1.30, p = .14), middle-aged (none vs. < 2 h B = 0.31, SE = 0.82, p = .71; none vs. > 2 h B = 1.49, SE = 0.85, p = .08) , and older adults (none vs. < 2 h B = − 0.36, SE = 0.85, p = .67; none vs. > 2 h B = − 0.08, SE = 0.98, p = .94). MCS scores differed significantly regarding healthy eating for older (low vs. medium B = 4.04, SE = 1.86, p = .03; low vs. high B = 6.43, SE = 1.96, p < .01) but not for young (low vs. medium B = − 0.49, SE = 1.14, p = .67; low vs. high B = − 2.61, SE = 2.21, p = .24) or middle-aged adults (low vs. medium B = − 0.46, SE = 1.34, p = .73; low vs. high B = − 0.73, SE = 1.88, p = .64)
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
How you live is how you feel? Positive associations between different lifestyle factors, cognitive functioning, and health-related quality of life across adulthood
Auteurs
Caroline Cohrdes
Gert B. M. Mensink
Heike Hölling
Publicatiedatum
22-08-2018
Uitgeverij
Springer International Publishing
Gepubliceerd in
Quality of Life Research / Uitgave 12/2018
Print ISSN: 0962-9343
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2649
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s11136-018-1971-8