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24-11-2015 | Original Paper

How Easy is it to Read the Minds of People with Autism Spectrum Disorder?

Auteurs: Elizabeth Sheppard, Dhanya Pillai, Genevieve Tze-Lynn Wong, Danielle Ropar, Peter Mitchell

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders | Uitgave 4/2016

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Abstract

How well can neurotypical adults’ interpret mental states in people with ASD? ‘Targets’ (ASD and neurotypical) reactions to four events were video-recorded then shown to neurotypical participants whose task was to identify which event the target had experienced. In study 1 participants were more successful for neurotypical than ASD targets. In study 2, participants rated ASD targets equally expressive as neurotypical targets for three of the events, while in study 3 participants gave different verbal descriptions of the reactions of ASD and neurotypical targets. It thus seems people with ASD react differently but not less expressively to events. Because neurotypicals are ineffective in interpreting the behaviour of those with ASD, this could contribute to the social difficulties in ASD.
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Metagegevens
Titel
How Easy is it to Read the Minds of People with Autism Spectrum Disorder?
Auteurs
Elizabeth Sheppard
Dhanya Pillai
Genevieve Tze-Lynn Wong
Danielle Ropar
Peter Mitchell
Publicatiedatum
24-11-2015
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders / Uitgave 4/2016
Print ISSN: 0162-3257
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3432
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10803-015-2662-8

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