Skip to main content
Top
Gepubliceerd in:

23-09-2016 | Original Article

Hitting is male, giving is female: automatic imitation and complementarity during action observation

Auteurs: Luisa Lugli, Anna Chiara Obertis, Anna M. Borghi

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 6/2017

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Is somebody going to hurt us? We draw back. The present study investigates using behavioral measures the interplay between imitative and complementary actions activated while observing female/male hands performing different actions. Female and male participants were required to discriminate the gender of biologically and artificially colored hands that displayed both individual (grasping) and social (giving and punching) actions. Biological hands evoked automatic imitation, while hands of different gender activated complementary mechanisms. Furthermore, responses reflected gender stereotypes: giving actions were more associated to females, punching actions to males. Results have implications for studies on social stereotyping, and for research on action observation, showing that the mirror neuron system resonates in both an imitative and complementary fashion.
Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Voetnoten
1
Notice that, in behavioral tasks, the presence of motor resonance can be inferred but not directly established, since the mirror system activation is not directly measured. Likely due to this reason, the authors of many behavioral studies prefer to avoid using the term “motor resonance”, and use instead “congruent action mapping”, "automatic imitation", “motor facilitation following observation of identical actions” or other formulations (Hamilton, 2013; Ocampo & Kriticos, 2010). Here we will use the term “automatic imitation”, even if this is inconsistent with our previous work (e.g., Anelli, Borghi, & Nicoletti, 2012; Liuzza, Setti, & Borghi, 2012; Ranzini, Borghi, & Nicoletti, 2011), due to the possible limitations of the use of "motor resonance" in the context of a behavioral study (see Heyes, 2010; see also Brass, Bekkering, Wohlschläger, & Prinz 2000; Brass, Bekkering, & Prinz, 2001).
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Aglioti, S. M., Cesari, P., Romani, M., & Urgesi, C. (2008). Action anticipation and motor resonance in elite basketball players. Nature Neuroscience, 11(9), 1109–1116.CrossRefPubMed Aglioti, S. M., Cesari, P., Romani, M., & Urgesi, C. (2008). Action anticipation and motor resonance in elite basketball players. Nature Neuroscience, 11(9), 1109–1116.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Anelli, F., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2012). Grasping the pain: motor resonance with dangerous affordances. Consciousness and Cognition, 21, 1627–1639.CrossRefPubMed Anelli, F., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2012). Grasping the pain: motor resonance with dangerous affordances. Consciousness and Cognition, 21, 1627–1639.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Avenanti, A., Sirigu, A., & Aglioti, S. M. (2010). Racial bias reduces empathic sensorimotor resonance with other-race pain. Current Biology, 20, 1018–1022.CrossRefPubMed Avenanti, A., Sirigu, A., & Aglioti, S. M. (2010). Racial bias reduces empathic sensorimotor resonance with other-race pain. Current Biology, 20, 1018–1022.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Bayliss, A. P., Di Pellegrino, G. D., & Tipper, S. P. (2005). Sex differences in eye gaze and symbolic cueing of attention. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 58, 631–650.CrossRefPubMed Bayliss, A. P., Di Pellegrino, G. D., & Tipper, S. P. (2005). Sex differences in eye gaze and symbolic cueing of attention. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 58, 631–650.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Becchio, C., Sartori, L., Bulgheroni, M., & Castiello, U. (2008). Both your intention and mine are reflected in the kinematics of my reach-to-grasp movement. Cognition, 106(2), 894–912.CrossRefPubMed Becchio, C., Sartori, L., Bulgheroni, M., & Castiello, U. (2008). Both your intention and mine are reflected in the kinematics of my reach-to-grasp movement. Cognition, 106(2), 894–912.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Brass, M., Bekkering, H., & Prinz, W. (2001). Movement observation affects movement execution in a simple response task. Acta Psychologica, 106, 3–22.CrossRefPubMed Brass, M., Bekkering, H., & Prinz, W. (2001). Movement observation affects movement execution in a simple response task. Acta Psychologica, 106, 3–22.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Brass, M., Bekkering, H., Wohlschläger, A., & Prinz, W. (2000). Compatibility between observed and executed finger movements: comparing symbolic, spatial, and imitative cues. Brain and Cognition, 44, 124–143.CrossRefPubMed Brass, M., Bekkering, H., Wohlschläger, A., & Prinz, W. (2000). Compatibility between observed and executed finger movements: comparing symbolic, spatial, and imitative cues. Brain and Cognition, 44, 124–143.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Buccino, G., Binkofski, F., Fink, G. R., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., Gallese, V., Seitz, R. J., Zilles, K., Rizzolatti, G., Freund, H. J. (2001). Action observation activates premotor and parietal areas in a somatotopic manner: an fMRI study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 13(2), 400–404.PubMed Buccino, G., Binkofski, F., Fink, G. R., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., Gallese, V., Seitz, R. J., Zilles, K., Rizzolatti, G., Freund, H. J. (2001). Action observation activates premotor and parietal areas in a somatotopic manner: an fMRI study. European Journal of Neuroscience, 13(2), 400–404.PubMed
go back to reference Calvo-Merino, B., Grèzes, J., Glaser, D. E., Passingham, R. E., & Haggard, P. (2006). Seeing or doing? Influence of visual and motor familiarity in action observation. Current Biology, 16(19), 1905–1910.CrossRefPubMed Calvo-Merino, B., Grèzes, J., Glaser, D. E., Passingham, R. E., & Haggard, P. (2006). Seeing or doing? Influence of visual and motor familiarity in action observation. Current Biology, 16(19), 1905–1910.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Carlo, G., Raffaelli, M., Laible, D. J., & Meyer, K. A. (1999). Why are girls less physically aggressive than boys? Personality and parenting mediators of physical aggression. Sex Roles, 40, 711–729.CrossRef Carlo, G., Raffaelli, M., Laible, D. J., & Meyer, K. A. (1999). Why are girls less physically aggressive than boys? Personality and parenting mediators of physical aggression. Sex Roles, 40, 711–729.CrossRef
go back to reference Chen, M., & Bargh, J. A. (1999). Consequences of automatic evaluation: immediate behavioral predispositions to approach or avoid the stimulus. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25, 215–224.CrossRef Chen, M., & Bargh, J. A. (1999). Consequences of automatic evaluation: immediate behavioral predispositions to approach or avoid the stimulus. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 25, 215–224.CrossRef
go back to reference Cheng, Y., Chou, K. H., Decety, J., Chen, I. Y., Hung, D., Tzeng, O. J. L., & Lin, C. P. (2009). Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of human mirror neuron system: a voxel-based morphometric investigation. Neuroscience, 158, 713–720.CrossRefPubMed Cheng, Y., Chou, K. H., Decety, J., Chen, I. Y., Hung, D., Tzeng, O. J. L., & Lin, C. P. (2009). Sex differences in the neuroanatomy of human mirror neuron system: a voxel-based morphometric investigation. Neuroscience, 158, 713–720.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference de Hamilton, A. F. C. (2013). The mirror neuron system contributes to social responding. Cortex, 49, 2957–2959.CrossRefPubMed de Hamilton, A. F. C. (2013). The mirror neuron system contributes to social responding. Cortex, 49, 2957–2959.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Deaner, R. O., Shepherd, S. V., & Platt, M. L. (2007). Familiarity accentuates gaze cuing in women but not men. Biology Letters, 3, 64–67.CrossRefPubMed Deaner, R. O., Shepherd, S. V., & Platt, M. L. (2007). Familiarity accentuates gaze cuing in women but not men. Biology Letters, 3, 64–67.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Eagly, A. H., & Steffen, V. J. (1986). Gender stereotypes stem from the distribution of women and men into social roles. Journal or Personality and Social Psychology, 46(4), 735–754.CrossRef Eagly, A. H., & Steffen, V. J. (1986). Gender stereotypes stem from the distribution of women and men into social roles. Journal or Personality and Social Psychology, 46(4), 735–754.CrossRef
go back to reference Ellis, R., Swabey, D., Bridgeman, J., May, B., Tucker, M., & Hyne, A. (2013). Bodies and other visual objects: the dialectics of reaching toward objects. Psychological Research, 77, 31–39.CrossRefPubMed Ellis, R., Swabey, D., Bridgeman, J., May, B., Tucker, M., & Hyne, A. (2013). Bodies and other visual objects: the dialectics of reaching toward objects. Psychological Research, 77, 31–39.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Ferri, F., Campione, G. C., Dalla Volta, R., Gianelli, C., & Gentilucci, M. (2010). To me or to you? When the self is advantaged. Experimental Brain Research, 203, 637–646.CrossRefPubMed Ferri, F., Campione, G. C., Dalla Volta, R., Gianelli, C., & Gentilucci, M. (2010). To me or to you? When the self is advantaged. Experimental Brain Research, 203, 637–646.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Freina, L., Baroni, G., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2009). Emotive concept-nouns and motor responses: attraction or repulsion? Memory and Cognition, 37, 493–499.CrossRefPubMed Freina, L., Baroni, G., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2009). Emotive concept-nouns and motor responses: attraction or repulsion? Memory and Cognition, 37, 493–499.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Frodi, A., Macaulay, J., & Thome, P. R. (1977). Are women always less aggressive than men? A review of the experimental literature. Psychological Bulletin, 84, 634–660.CrossRefPubMed Frodi, A., Macaulay, J., & Thome, P. R. (1977). Are women always less aggressive than men? A review of the experimental literature. Psychological Bulletin, 84, 634–660.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Gallese, V., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., & Rizzolatti, G. (1996). Action recognition in the premotor cortex. Brain, 119, 593–609.CrossRefPubMed Gallese, V., Fadiga, L., Fogassi, L., & Rizzolatti, G. (1996). Action recognition in the premotor cortex. Brain, 119, 593–609.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Geary, D. C. (2010). Male, female: the evolution of human sex differences (2nd ed.). Washington: American Psychological Association.CrossRef Geary, D. C. (2010). Male, female: the evolution of human sex differences (2nd ed.). Washington: American Psychological Association.CrossRef
go back to reference Harris, M. B., & Siebel, C. E. (1975). Affect, aggression, and altruism. Developmental Psychology, 11, 623–627.CrossRef Harris, M. B., & Siebel, C. E. (1975). Affect, aggression, and altruism. Developmental Psychology, 11, 623–627.CrossRef
go back to reference Heyes, C. (2010). Automatic imitation. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 463–483.CrossRef Heyes, C. (2010). Automatic imitation. Psychological Bulletin, 137, 463–483.CrossRef
go back to reference Hommel, B., Musseler, J., Aschersleben, G., & Prinz, W. (2001). The theory of event coding (TEC): a framework for perception and action planning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 849–878.CrossRefPubMed Hommel, B., Musseler, J., Aschersleben, G., & Prinz, W. (2001). The theory of event coding (TEC): a framework for perception and action planning. Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 24, 849–878.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Liuzza, M. T., Setti, A., & Borghi, A. M. (2012). Kids observing other kids’ hands: visuomotor priming in children. Consciousness and Cognition, 21, 383–392.CrossRefPubMed Liuzza, M. T., Setti, A., & Borghi, A. M. (2012). Kids observing other kids’ hands: visuomotor priming in children. Consciousness and Cognition, 21, 383–392.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Lugli, L., Baroni, G., Gianelli, C., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2012). Self, others, objects: How this triadic interaction modulates our behaviour. Memory and Cognition, 40, 1373–1386.CrossRefPubMed Lugli, L., Baroni, G., Gianelli, C., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2012). Self, others, objects: How this triadic interaction modulates our behaviour. Memory and Cognition, 40, 1373–1386.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Newman-Norlund, R. D., van Schie, H. T., van Zuijlen, A. M. J., & Bekkering, H. (2007). The human mirror neuron system is more active during complementary compared with imitative action. Nature Neuroscience, 10, 817–818.CrossRefPubMed Newman-Norlund, R. D., van Schie, H. T., van Zuijlen, A. M. J., & Bekkering, H. (2007). The human mirror neuron system is more active during complementary compared with imitative action. Nature Neuroscience, 10, 817–818.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Ocampo, B., & Kriticos, A. (2010). Placing actions in context: motor facilitation following observation of identical and non-identical manual acts. Experimental Brain Research, 201, 743–751.CrossRefPubMed Ocampo, B., & Kriticos, A. (2010). Placing actions in context: motor facilitation following observation of identical and non-identical manual acts. Experimental Brain Research, 201, 743–751.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Öhman, A., Lundqvist, D., & Esteves, F. (2001). The face in the crowd revisited: a threat advantage with schematic stimuli. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 381–396.CrossRefPubMed Öhman, A., Lundqvist, D., & Esteves, F. (2001). The face in the crowd revisited: a threat advantage with schematic stimuli. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 381–396.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Prinz, W. (1997). Perception and action planning. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 9, 129–154.CrossRef Prinz, W. (1997). Perception and action planning. European Journal of Cognitive Psychology, 9, 129–154.CrossRef
go back to reference Ranzini, M., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2011). With hands I do not centre! Action- and object-related effects of hand-cueing in the line bisection. Neuropsychologia, 49, 2918–2928.CrossRefPubMed Ranzini, M., Borghi, A. M., & Nicoletti, R. (2011). With hands I do not centre! Action- and object-related effects of hand-cueing in the line bisection. Neuropsychologia, 49, 2918–2928.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Rizzolatti, G., & Craighero, L. (2004). The mirror neuron system. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 27, 169–192.CrossRefPubMed Rizzolatti, G., & Craighero, L. (2004). The mirror neuron system. Annual Review of Neuroscience, 27, 169–192.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Rudman, L. A., Greenwald, A. G. & McGhee, D. E. (2001). Implicit self-concept and evaluative implicit gender stereotypes: self and ingroup share desirable traits. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 1164–1178.CrossRef Rudman, L. A., Greenwald, A. G. & McGhee, D. E. (2001). Implicit self-concept and evaluative implicit gender stereotypes: self and ingroup share desirable traits. Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin, 27, 1164–1178.CrossRef
go back to reference Sartori, L., Bucchioni, G., & Castiello, U. (2013). When emulation becomes reciprocity. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 8, 662–669.CrossRefPubMed Sartori, L., Bucchioni, G., & Castiello, U. (2013). When emulation becomes reciprocity. Social Cognitive and Affective Neuroscience, 8, 662–669.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Sartori, L., Cavallo, A., Bucchioni, G., & Castiello, U. (2012). From simulation to reciprocity: the case of complementary actions. Social Neuroscience, 7, 146–158.CrossRefPubMed Sartori, L., Cavallo, A., Bucchioni, G., & Castiello, U. (2012). From simulation to reciprocity: the case of complementary actions. Social Neuroscience, 7, 146–158.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Scorolli, C., Miatton, M., Wheaton, L., & Borghi, A. M. (2014). I give you a cup, I get a cup: a kinematic study on social intention. Neuropsychologia, 57, 196–204.CrossRefPubMed Scorolli, C., Miatton, M., Wheaton, L., & Borghi, A. M. (2014). I give you a cup, I get a cup: a kinematic study on social intention. Neuropsychologia, 57, 196–204.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Seibt, B., Neumann, R., Nussinson, R., & Strack, F. (2008). Movement direction or change in distance? Self- and object-related approach-avoidance motions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 713–720.CrossRef Seibt, B., Neumann, R., Nussinson, R., & Strack, F. (2008). Movement direction or change in distance? Self- and object-related approach-avoidance motions. Journal of Experimental Social Psychology, 44, 713–720.CrossRef
go back to reference Topolinski, S., Maschmann, I. T., Pecher, D., & Winkielman, P. (2014). Oral approach–avoidance: affective consequences of muscular articulation dynamics. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(6), 885.CrossRefPubMed Topolinski, S., Maschmann, I. T., Pecher, D., & Winkielman, P. (2014). Oral approach–avoidance: affective consequences of muscular articulation dynamics. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 106(6), 885.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Urgesi, C., Moro, V., Candidi, M., & Aglioti, S. M. (2006). Mapping implied body actions in the human motor system. The Journal of Neuroscience, 26, 7942–7949.CrossRefPubMed Urgesi, C., Moro, V., Candidi, M., & Aglioti, S. M. (2006). Mapping implied body actions in the human motor system. The Journal of Neuroscience, 26, 7942–7949.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference van Dantzig, S., Pecher, D., & Zwaan, R. A. (2008). Approach and avoidance as action effect. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 61, 1298–1306.CrossRef van Dantzig, S., Pecher, D., & Zwaan, R. A. (2008). Approach and avoidance as action effect. Quarterly Journal of Experimental Psychology, 61, 1298–1306.CrossRef
go back to reference van Schie, H. T., van Waterschoot, B. M., & Bekkering, H. (2008). Understanding action beyond imitation: reversed compatibility effects of action observation in imitation and joint action. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 34, 1493–1500.PubMed van Schie, H. T., van Waterschoot, B. M., & Bekkering, H. (2008). Understanding action beyond imitation: reversed compatibility effects of action observation in imitation and joint action. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 34, 1493–1500.PubMed
Metagegevens
Titel
Hitting is male, giving is female: automatic imitation and complementarity during action observation
Auteurs
Luisa Lugli
Anna Chiara Obertis
Anna M. Borghi
Publicatiedatum
23-09-2016
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 6/2017
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-016-0808-8

Andere artikelen Uitgave 6/2017

Psychological Research 6/2017 Naar de uitgave