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Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness 3/2012

01-09-2012 | EDITORIAL

German Contributions to Mindfulness Research, Part 1: Context and Concept of Mindfulness

Auteurs: Stefan Schmidt, Zeno Kupper

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 3/2012

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Excerpt

Mindfulness has never been an easy concept to grasp, and to talk about mindfulness is usually even more difficult than experiencing it. Moreover, along with its rapidly growing popularity, whatever is meant by “mindfulness” seems to become even more fuzzy and evasive. One reason for this development might be that the application of mindfulness stretches further every day, and with every new application, the concept changes a little. Mindfulness is often seen as invariant, as being always the same, whether practiced in a Buddhist monastery in India in the first century bc or in a course on management skills in Wisconsin in 2012. One may think that “observing the breath” is “observing the breath,” whether long ago or today. But, this is probably only half of the truth. The other half is that the results of mindfulness practice are also determined by motivational factors, such as intention and goals (see Schmidt 2011). While the practice of nonjudgmental observation of all present moment experiences may well be the same throughout time and culture, the intention related to such a practice is highly dependent on its context. It makes a difference whether one seeks spiritual growth and insights, wants to improve coping abilities in the face of a difficult clinical condition, or aims to develop skills for successful professional communication. It is in this sense that it might be helpful to always address mindfulness in the respective context, especially if we want to avoid diluting the meaning associated with the term “mindfulness.” …
Literatuur
go back to reference Nattier, J. (1995). Visible and invisible: Jan Nattier on the politics of representation in buddhist America. Tricycle, 5, 42–49. Nattier, J. (1995). Visible and invisible: Jan Nattier on the politics of representation in buddhist America. Tricycle, 5, 42–49.
go back to reference Schmidt, S. (2011). Mindfulness in east and west—is it the same? In H. Walach, S. Schmidt, & W. B. Jonas (Eds.), Neuroscience, consciousness and spirituality (pp. 23–38). New York: Springer. CrossRef Schmidt, S. (2011). Mindfulness in east and west—is it the same? In H. Walach, S. Schmidt, & W. B. Jonas (Eds.), Neuroscience, consciousness and spirituality (pp. 23–38). New York: Springer. CrossRef
go back to reference Walach, H. (2011). Neuroscience, consciousness, spirituality—questions, problems and potential solutions: an introductory essay. In H. Walach, S. Schmidt, & W. B. Jonas (Eds.), Neuroscience, consciousness and spirituality (pp. 1–21). New York: Springer. CrossRef Walach, H. (2011). Neuroscience, consciousness, spirituality—questions, problems and potential solutions: an introductory essay. In H. Walach, S. Schmidt, & W. B. Jonas (Eds.), Neuroscience, consciousness and spirituality (pp. 1–21). New York: Springer. CrossRef
Metagegevens
Titel
German Contributions to Mindfulness Research, Part 1: Context and Concept of Mindfulness
Auteurs
Stefan Schmidt
Zeno Kupper
Publicatiedatum
01-09-2012
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 3/2012
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-012-0138-x