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Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness 2/2018

15-09-2017 | ORIGINAL PAPER

Forgive and Let Go: Effect of Self-Compassion on Post-Event Processing in Social Anxiety

Auteurs: Rebecca A. Blackie, Nancy L. Kocovski

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 2/2018

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Abstract

Post-event processing refers to negative and repetitive thinking following socially anxious situations and has been posited as a maintaining factor in social anxiety. One strategy for reducing post-event processing may be through self-compassion, which was the primary purpose of the present study. An additional aim was to examine the effect of self-compassion on willingness to engage in future social scenarios. Socially anxious undergraduates (N = 98) provided an impromptu speech and were randomly assigned to a self-compassion, rumination, or control condition. Participants completed measures of post-event processing and willingness to engage in social situations the following day. As expected, self-compassion immediately following a speech led to less post-event processing the next day, as well as greater willingness to engage in future social situations. There was also support for a mediation model illustrating the mechanisms through which self-compassion exerted its effects on these two outcomes. Taken together, these findings demonstrate the utility of self-compassion on reducing the negative and repetitive thinking that serves to maintain social anxiety and increasing willingness to partake in future social events.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Forgive and Let Go: Effect of Self-Compassion on Post-Event Processing in Social Anxiety
Auteurs
Rebecca A. Blackie
Nancy L. Kocovski
Publicatiedatum
15-09-2017
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 2/2018
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-017-0808-9