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09-09-2022

Fatalistic cancer beliefs and self-reported cancer screening behaviors among diverse urban residents

Auteurs: Laura C. Pinheiro, Orysya Soroka, Dominic T. Razon, Francesse Antoine, Julia Rothman, Margaux J. Kanis, Uqba Khan, Rulla M. Tamimi, David Nanus, Erica Phillips

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Behavioral Medicine | Uitgave 6/2022

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Abstract

Cancer fatalism–the belief that death is inevitable when cancer is present–has been identified as a barrier to cancer screening, detection, and treatment. Our study examined the relationship between self-reported cancer fatalism and adherence to cancer screening guidelines of the breasts, cervix, colon, and prostate among a diverse sample of urban-dwelling adults in Brooklyn, New York. Between May 2019 and August 2020, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of adults 40 + years of age (n = 2,341) residing in Brooklyn neighborhoods with high cancer mortality. Multivariable logistic regression models were used to assess the odds of reporting cancer screening completion across three fatalistic cancer belief categories (low, med, high). Participants’ median age was 61 (IQR 51, 71) years, 61% were women, 49% self-identified as non-Hispanic black, 11% Hispanic, 4% Asian, and 6% more than one race. There were no statistically significant differences in the proportion of low, some, or high fatalistic beliefs identified among male respondents compared to women. Among women, we observed that high fatalistic cancer beliefs were associated with higher odds (OR 2.01; 95% CI 1.10–3.65) of completing breast but not cervical (1.04; CI 0.55–1.99) or colon (1.54; CI 0.88–2.69) cancer screening. Men with high fatalistic cancer beliefs had a trend towards lower odds of prostate screening (OR 0.53: 95% CI 0.18–1.57) compared to men with low fatalistic beliefs, but neither was statistically significant. Findings suggest that high fatalistic cancer beliefs may be an important factor in cancer screening utilization among women. Further examination in longitudinal cohorts with a larger sample of men may be needed in order to identify any significant effect.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Fatalistic cancer beliefs and self-reported cancer screening behaviors among diverse urban residents
Auteurs
Laura C. Pinheiro
Orysya Soroka
Dominic T. Razon
Francesse Antoine
Julia Rothman
Margaux J. Kanis
Uqba Khan
Rulla M. Tamimi
David Nanus
Erica Phillips
Publicatiedatum
09-09-2022
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Behavioral Medicine / Uitgave 6/2022
Print ISSN: 0160-7715
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3521
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-022-00358-7

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