Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies 11/2021

07-09-2021 | Original Paper

Exploring the Recovery of Non-offending Parents after a Child’s Sexual Abuse Event

Auteurs: Heather L. Vilvens, David E. Jones, Lisa M. Vaughn

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies | Uitgave 11/2021

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

A variety of factors influence a child’s recovery from a child sexual abuse (CSA) event including the non-offending parent’s role in the healing process of their child. The purpose of this study was to gain a better understanding of how non-offending parents recuperate from a CSA occurrence. By better understanding non-offending parents’ perspectives related to the healing process, health professionals can provide effective supports, programs, and services. We recruited and conducted in-depth qualitative interviews with 16 non-offending parents to explore their risk factors, protective factors, stressors, coping strategies, and perceptions of healing following their child’s sexual abuse event. We also invited parents to contribute specific ideas to improve programs and services offered to families of sexual abuse served by a child advocacy center located in an urban pediatric hospital. Our findings included five themes: (1) a variety of emotions are present; (2) family context influences recovery; (3) coping is different for everyone; (4) navigating the justice system is frustrating; and (5) healing is a process. The results of our study revealed that the non-offending parents that were managing their child’s sexual abuse event more productively were further along in the healing process (as compared with their counterparts) and had successfully processed their emotions, described less chaos in their family unit, employed positive coping strategies, and had found a way to move forward and accept a “new normal”. The findings of our study can be used to promote recovery and provide better services to non-offending parents following a CSA event.

Met onderstaand(e) abonnement(en) heeft u direct toegang:

BSL Psychologie Totaal

Met BSL Psychologie Totaal blijf je als professional steeds op de hoogte van de nieuwste ontwikkelingen binnen jouw vak. Met het online abonnement heb je toegang tot een groot aantal boeken, protocollen, vaktijdschriften en e-learnings op het gebied van psychologie en psychiatrie. Zo kun je op je gemak en wanneer het jou het beste uitkomt verdiepen in jouw vakgebied.

Bijlagen
Alleen toegankelijk voor geautoriseerde gebruikers
Voetnoten
1
The vignette above was written by the authors based on a combination of detailed descriptions from our interview participants depicting what parents grappled with once they learned of their child’s sexual abuse event. The purpose of this writing is to bring the reader closer to the personal side of a traumatic event such as this and to facilitate a better understanding of the non-offending parents’ experiences.
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Barnett, D., Manly, J. T., & Cicchetti, D. (1993). Defining child maltreatment: the interface between policy and research. In D. Cicchetti, & S. L. Toth (Eds.), Child abuse, child development, and social policy. Ablex. Barnett, D., Manly, J. T., & Cicchetti, D. (1993). Defining child maltreatment: the interface between policy and research. In D. Cicchetti, & S. L. Toth (Eds.), Child abuse, child development, and social policy. Ablex.
go back to reference Fuller, G. (2016). Non-offending parents as secondary victims of child sexual assault. Trends & Issues in Crime & Criminal Justice, (500), 1–7. Fuller, G. (2016). Non-offending parents as secondary victims of child sexual assault. Trends & Issues in Crime & Criminal Justice, (500), 1–7.
go back to reference Manion, I. G., McIntyre, J., Firestone, P., Ligezinska, M., Ensom, R., & Wells, G. (1996). Secondary traumatization in parents following the disclosure of extrafamilial child sexual abuse: Initial effect. Child Abuse & Neglect, 20(11), 1095–1109. CrossRef Manion, I. G., McIntyre, J., Firestone, P., Ligezinska, M., Ensom, R., & Wells, G. (1996). Secondary traumatization in parents following the disclosure of extrafamilial child sexual abuse: Initial effect. Child Abuse & Neglect, 20(11), 1095–1109. CrossRef
go back to reference Minkler, M., & Wallerstein, N. (Eds.) (2008). Community-based participatory research for health: from process to outcomes (2nd ed.). Jossey-Bass. Minkler, M., & Wallerstein, N. (Eds.) (2008). Community-based participatory research for health: from process to outcomes (2nd ed.). Jossey-Bass.
go back to reference Omenn, G. S., Fielding, J. E., & Lave, L. B. (1994). Child abuse. Annual Review of Psychology, 15, 367–379. Omenn, G. S., Fielding, J. E., & Lave, L. B. (1994). Child abuse. Annual Review of Psychology, 15, 367–379.
go back to reference Pope, C., Ziebland, S. & Mays, N. (2000). Qualitative research in health care: analysing qualitative data. BMJ: British Medical Journal, (7227), 114. Pope, C., Ziebland, S. & Mays, N. (2000). Qualitative research in health care: analysing qualitative data. BMJ: British Medical Journal, (7227), 114.
go back to reference Strauss A. & Corbin J. (1967). Discovery of grounded theory. Aldine. Strauss A. & Corbin J. (1967). Discovery of grounded theory. Aldine.
go back to reference Strauss A., and Corbin J. (1998). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Sage Publications, Inc. Strauss A., and Corbin J. (1998). Basics of qualitative research: Techniques and procedures for developing grounded theory. Sage Publications, Inc.
Metagegevens
Titel
Exploring the Recovery of Non-offending Parents after a Child’s Sexual Abuse Event
Auteurs
Heather L. Vilvens
David E. Jones
Lisa M. Vaughn
Publicatiedatum
07-09-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Child and Family Studies / Uitgave 11/2021
Print ISSN: 1062-1024
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2843
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-021-02082-3