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20-01-2023

Evaluating Objective Metrics of habit strength for taking medications

Auteurs: L. Alison Phillips, Antoine Pironet, Bernard Vrijens

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Behavioral Medicine

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Abstract

Habit strength for taking medication is associated with medication adherence. However, habit strength is typically measured via self-reports, which have limitations. Objective sensors may provide advantages to self-reports. To evaluate whether habit-strength metrics derived from objective sensor data (MEMS® Caps; AARDEX Group) are associated with self-reported habit strength and adherence (objective and self-reported) and whether objective and self-reported habit strength are independently associated with adherence. Patients (N = 79) on oral medications for type 2 diabetes completed self-reports of habit strength and medication adherence and used MEMS® Caps to take their prescribed medication for one month. MEMS® Caps data were used to create five objective metrics of habit strength (e.g., individual-level variance in pill timing) and quantify medication adherence (% days correct dosing). Consistency in behavior from week to week (versus across each day) had the greatest association with self-reported habit strength (r(78) = 0.29, = 0.01), self-reported adherence (r(78) = 0.32, = 0.005), and objective adherence (r(78) = 0.61, < 0.001). Objective and self-reported habit strength were independently associated with adherence. Weekly pill-timing consistency may be more useful than daily pill-timing consistency for predicting adherence and understanding patients’ medication-taking habits. Self-reports and objective metrics of habit strength may be measuring different constructs, warranting further research.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Evaluating Objective Metrics of habit strength for taking medications
Auteurs
L. Alison Phillips
Antoine Pironet
Bernard Vrijens
Publicatiedatum
20-01-2023
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Behavioral Medicine
Print ISSN: 0160-7715
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-3521
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10865-023-00392-z