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Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research 6/2020

31-07-2020 | Original Article

Emotion Malleability Beliefs and Emotion Experience and Regulation in the Daily Lives of People with High Trait Social Anxiety

Auteurs: Katharine E. Daniel, Fallon R. Goodman, Miranda L. Beltzer, Alexander R. Daros, Mehdi Boukhechba, Laura E. Barnes, Bethany A. Teachman

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 6/2020

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Abstract

Background

The extent to which a person believes they can change or control their own emotions is associated with trait-level symptoms of mood and anxiety-related psychopathology.

Method

The present study examined how this belief relates to momentary and daily self-reports of affect, emotion regulation tendencies, and perceived effectiveness of emotion regulation attempts throughout a five-week experience sampling study conducted in N = 113 high socially anxious people (https://​osf.​io/​eprwt/​).

Results

Results suggest that people with relatively stronger beliefs that their emotions are malleable experienced more momentary and daily positive affect (relative to negative affect), even after controlling for social anxiety symptom severity (although only daily positive affect, and not momentary positive affect, remained significant after correcting for false discovery rate). However, emotion malleability beliefs were not uniquely associated with other emotion regulation-related outcomes in daily life, despite theory suggesting malleability beliefs influence motivation to engage in emotion regulation.

Conclusion

The paucity of significant associations observed between trait malleability beliefs and momentary and daily self-reports of emotion regulation (despite consistent findings of such relationships at trait levels) calls for additional research to better understand the complex dynamics of emotion beliefs in daily life.

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Voetnoten
1
The strategies were: “ruminating about something” (rumination); “coming up with ideas/plans for action” (problem solving); “accepting them” (acceptance); “criticizing myself” (self-criticism); “thinking of the situation differently” (cognitive reappraisal); “thinking about the things that went/are going well” (thinking good thoughts); “pushing away bad thoughts” (thought suppression); “tackling the issue head on” (tackling the issue head on); “drinking alcohol” (alcohol); “using marijuana, nicotine, or other drugs” (drugs); “eating food” (eating); “exercising” (exercising), “TV/internet/gaming” (TV/gaming); “sleeping” (sleeping); “seeking advice/comfort from others” (advice-seeking); “ignoring/avoiding certain people/situations” (situational avoidance); hiding my thoughts/feelings from others (expression suppression); “doing something fun with others” (doing something fun with others). Participants saw the text in quotation marks rather than the conceptual labels in parentheses.
 
2
Given that approximately half of the participants were randomized to receive an online cognitive bias modification for interpretations (CBM-I) intervention during Week 3 of the 5-week study, we statistically control for study condition in all analyses. Although CBM-I does not directly target emotion malleability beliefs (rather, it aims to reduce the tendency to rigidly interpret ambiguous social situations negatively, see Mathews and Mackintosh 2000), it is possible that the online intervention may have influenced emotion mindset and therefore daily life outcomes following the intervention.
 
3
In response to a helpful reviewer comment, we included overall daily negative affect as a control variable and random intercept in all daily analyses (with the exception of the model predicting overall daily affect).
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Emotion Malleability Beliefs and Emotion Experience and Regulation in the Daily Lives of People with High Trait Social Anxiety
Auteurs
Katharine E. Daniel
Fallon R. Goodman
Miranda L. Beltzer
Alexander R. Daros
Mehdi Boukhechba
Laura E. Barnes
Bethany A. Teachman
Publicatiedatum
31-07-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 6/2020
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-020-10139-8