Skip to main content
Top
Gepubliceerd in:

26-04-2023 | Original Paper

Emerging Adults’ Perceptions of and Responses to Interparental Conflict

Auteurs: Kelly A. Warmuth, Angelina M. DeCapua, Abigail M. Fielding

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies | Uitgave 4/2024

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Negative and intense interparental conflict threatens emotional security, and children may respond to restore security, but emerging adults’ responses remain underexplored. We explored the relationship between perceived valence (positivity/negativity), intensity, and their interaction on 161 emerging adults’ (28% males) responses to interparental conflict. Participants listened to six audio conflict vignettes and rated their perceived negativity and intensity for each, as well as how they would respond if that conflict were between their parents. Using generalized estimating equations and linear mixed effects modeling, main effects showed that as perceived negativity or intensity increased, emerging adults were less likely to continue like normal, indicating their emotionally security was faltering, and they were more likely to attend to the conflict. Interaction effects showed that when emerging adults perceived conflict negativity and intensity as increasing across vignettes, they were even more likely to respond to the conflict with negative emotional reactivity, behavioral dysregulation, and mediation, but were less likely to respond with avoidance. Discussion addresses age-related differences in coping efficacy and emerging adults’ attempts to restore emotional security even when no longer living at home.
Literatuur
go back to reference Arnett, J. J. (2014). Emerging adulthood: The winding road from the late teens through the twenties (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press. Arnett, J. J. (2014). Emerging adulthood: The winding road from the late teens through the twenties (2nd ed.). Oxford University Press.
go back to reference Bergman, K. N., Cummings, E. M., & Warmuth, K. A. (2016). The benefits of marital conflict: Constructiveness and resolution as predictors of positive child outcomes. In D. Narvaez, J. M. Braungart-Rieker, L. E. Miller-Graff, L. T. Gettler, & P. D. Hastings (Eds.), Contexts for young child flourishing: Evolution, family, and society (pp. 233–245). Oxford University Press. Bergman, K. N., Cummings, E. M., & Warmuth, K. A. (2016). The benefits of marital conflict: Constructiveness and resolution as predictors of positive child outcomes. In D. Narvaez, J. M. Braungart-Rieker, L. E. Miller-Graff, L. T. Gettler, & P. D. Hastings (Eds.), Contexts for young child flourishing: Evolution, family, and society (pp. 233–245). Oxford University Press.
go back to reference Bradford, K., Barber, B. K., Olsen, J. A., Maughan, S. L., Erickson, L. D., Ward, D., & Stolz, H. E. (2004). A multi-national study of interparental conflict, parenting, and adolescent functioning: South Africa, Bangladesh, China, India, Bosnia, Germany, Palestine, Colombia, and the United States. Marriage & Family Review, 35(3–4), 1–7–137. https://doi.org/10.1300/J002v35n03_07.CrossRef Bradford, K., Barber, B. K., Olsen, J. A., Maughan, S. L., Erickson, L. D., Ward, D., & Stolz, H. E. (2004). A multi-national study of interparental conflict, parenting, and adolescent functioning: South Africa, Bangladesh, China, India, Bosnia, Germany, Palestine, Colombia, and the United States. Marriage & Family Review, 35(3–4), 1–7–137. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1300/​J002v35n03_​07.CrossRef
go back to reference Brauer, M., & Curtin, J. J. (2018). Linear mixed-effects models and the analysis of nonindependent data: A unified framework to analyze categorical and continuous independent variables that vary within-subjects and/or within-Items. Psychological Methods, 23(3), 389–411. https://doi.org/10.1037/met0000159.CrossRefPubMed Brauer, M., & Curtin, J. J. (2018). Linear mixed-effects models and the analysis of nonindependent data: A unified framework to analyze categorical and continuous independent variables that vary within-subjects and/or within-Items. Psychological Methods, 23(3), 389–411. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1037/​met0000159.CrossRefPubMed
go back to reference Grych, J. H., & Cardoza-Fernandes, S. (2001). Understanding the impact of interparental conflict on children: The role of social cognitive processes. In J. H. Grych & F. D. Fincham (Eds.), Interparental conflict and child development: Theory, research, and applications (pp. 157–187). Cambridge University Press. Grych, J. H., & Cardoza-Fernandes, S. (2001). Understanding the impact of interparental conflict on children: The role of social cognitive processes. In J. H. Grych & F. D. Fincham (Eds.), Interparental conflict and child development: Theory, research, and applications (pp. 157–187). Cambridge University Press.
go back to reference Hall, E. J., & Cummings, E. M. (1997). The effects of marital and parent-child conflicts on other family members: Grandmothers and grown children. Family Relations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Studies, 46(2), 135–143. https://doi.org/10.2307/585037.CrossRef Hall, E. J., & Cummings, E. M. (1997). The effects of marital and parent-child conflicts on other family members: Grandmothers and grown children. Family Relations: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Applied Family Studies, 46(2), 135–143. https://​doi.​org/​10.​2307/​585037.CrossRef
go back to reference Heck, R. H., Thomas, S. L., & Tabata, L. N. (2013). Multilevel and longitudinal modeling with IBM SPSS (2nd ed.). Routledge. Heck, R. H., Thomas, S. L., & Tabata, L. N. (2013). Multilevel and longitudinal modeling with IBM SPSS (2nd ed.). Routledge.
go back to reference Hox, J. J. (2010). Multilevel analysis: Techniques and applications (2nd ed.). Quantitative methodology series. Routledge. Hox, J. J. (2010). Multilevel analysis: Techniques and applications (2nd ed.). Quantitative methodology series. Routledge.
go back to reference Kerig, P. K. (2001). Children’s coping with interparental conflict. In J. H. Grych & F. D. Fincham (Eds.), Interparental conflict and child development: Theory, research, and applications (pp. 213–245). Cambridge University Press. Kerig, P. K. (2001). Children’s coping with interparental conflict. In J. H. Grych & F. D. Fincham (Eds.), Interparental conflict and child development: Theory, research, and applications (pp. 213–245). Cambridge University Press.
go back to reference Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods (2nd ed.). Sage Publications, Inc. Raudenbush, S. W., & Bryk, A. S. (2002). Hierarchical linear models: Applications and data analysis methods (2nd ed.). Sage Publications, Inc.
go back to reference van Eldik, W. M., de Haan, A. D., Parry, L. Q., Davies, P. T., Luijk, M. P. C. M., Arends, L. R., & Prinzie, P. (2020). The interparental relationship: Meta-analytic associations with children’s maladjustment and responses to interparental conflict. Psychological Bulletin, 146(7), 553–594. https://doi.org/10.1037/bul0000233.CrossRefPubMed van Eldik, W. M., de Haan, A. D., Parry, L. Q., Davies, P. T., Luijk, M. P. C. M., Arends, L. R., & Prinzie, P. (2020). The interparental relationship: Meta-analytic associations with children’s maladjustment and responses to interparental conflict. Psychological Bulletin, 146(7), 553–594. https://​doi.​org/​10.​1037/​bul0000233.CrossRefPubMed
Metagegevens
Titel
Emerging Adults’ Perceptions of and Responses to Interparental Conflict
Auteurs
Kelly A. Warmuth
Angelina M. DeCapua
Abigail M. Fielding
Publicatiedatum
26-04-2023
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Child and Family Studies / Uitgave 4/2024
Print ISSN: 1062-1024
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2843
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-023-02582-4

Andere artikelen Uitgave 4/2024

Journal of Child and Family Studies 4/2024 Naar de uitgave