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06-01-2022 | Original Paper

Duration of US Residence And Resource Needs In Immigrant Families With Young Children

Auteurs: Carol Duh-Leong, Suzy Tomopoulos, Andrew Nastro, Iman Sharif, Laura Ibanez Gomez, Cecilia Di Caprio, Nikita Nagpal, Arthur H. Fierman

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Child and Family Studies | Uitgave 1/2022

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Abstract

To mitigate the negative impact of resource needs on child health, practices serving low-income immigrant families have implemented screening programs to connect families to community resources. Little is known about how duration of US residence relates to patterns of resource needs and indicators of acculturation such as community resource knowledge/experience or self-efficacy. We conducted a cross-sectional analysis of a convenience sample of immigrant families with young children at an urban primary care clinic. These families were seen 5/2018–1/2020 for well child care, screening positive for ≥1 social need using a tool derived from Health Leads. Analysis of 114 families found that newly arrived families with a shorter duration of US residence (≤5 years) were more likely to report immediate material hardships like food insecurity and need for essential child supplies. Newly arrived families were also less likely to have access to technology resources such as a computer or smartphone. Long-term families with a longer duration of US residence (≥15 years) were more likely to report chronic needs like poor housing conditions, but also reported increased community resource knowledge/experience and increased self-efficacy. Primary care pediatric practices should assess immigration contextual factors to identify subgroups such as newly arrived families with young children to target resources (e.g., increase screening frequency) or enhance services (e.g., patient navigators) to relieve resource needs.
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Duration of US Residence And Resource Needs In Immigrant Families With Young Children
Auteurs
Carol Duh-Leong
Suzy Tomopoulos
Andrew Nastro
Iman Sharif
Laura Ibanez Gomez
Cecilia Di Caprio
Nikita Nagpal
Arthur H. Fierman
Publicatiedatum
06-01-2022
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Child and Family Studies / Uitgave 1/2022
Print ISSN: 1062-1024
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2843
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10826-021-02182-0

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