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Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research 2/2011

01-03-2011 | Original Article

Does motor interference arise from mirror system activation? The effect of prior visuo-motor practice on automatic imitation

Auteurs: Rémi L. Capa, Peter J. Marshall, Thomas F. Shipley, Robin N. Salesse, Cédric A. Bouquet

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 2/2011

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Abstract

Action perception may involve a mirror-matching system, such that observed actions are mapped onto the observer’s own motor representations. The strength of such mirror system activation should depend on an individual’s experience with the observed action. The motor interference effect, where an observed action interferes with a concurrently executed incongruent action, is thought to arise from mirror system activation. However, this view was recently challenged. If motor interference arises from mirror system activation, this effect should be sensitive to prior sensorimotor experience with the observed action. To test this prediction, we measured motor interference in two groups of participants observing the same incongruent movements. One group had received brief visuo-motor practice with the observed incongruent action, but not the other group. Action observation induced a larger motor interference in participants who had practiced the observed action. This result thus supports a mirror system account of motor interference.
Voetnoten
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This difference remained significant when either the first or the second baseline condition was used as the baseline value instead of the average of the two baseline conditions (t(42) = 3.32, p < 0.002, d = 1.21, and t(42) = 2.67, p < 0.01, d = 0.80, respectively).
 
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Metagegevens
Titel
Does motor interference arise from mirror system activation? The effect of prior visuo-motor practice on automatic imitation
Auteurs
Rémi L. Capa
Peter J. Marshall
Thomas F. Shipley
Robin N. Salesse
Cédric A. Bouquet
Publicatiedatum
01-03-2011
Uitgeverij
Springer-Verlag
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 2/2011
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-010-0303-6