Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

26-06-2015 | Original Paper | Uitgave 11/2015

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 11/2015

Does Gender Moderate Core Deficits in ASD? An Investigation into Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Girls and Boys with ASD

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders > Uitgave 11/2015
Auteurs:
Clare Harrop, Amanda Gulsrud, Connie Kasari

Abstract

Due to the uneven gender ratio of autism spectrum disorders (ASD), girls are rarely studied independently from boys. Research focusing on restricted and repetitive behaviors (RRBs) indicates that above the age of six girls have fewer and/or different RRBs than boys with ASD. In this study we investigated whether girls and boys with ASD demonstrated similar rates and types of RRBs in early childhood, using discrete observational coding from a video-taped play interaction. Twenty-nine girls with ASD were matched to 29 boys based on ASD severity. While boys in our sample demonstrated a greater frequency of RRBs, this was not significant and our findings indicate that girls and boys under five are more similar than dissimilar on this core deficit. However our data also revealed a trend toward gender-differential growth trajectories—a finding worthy of further investigation in larger samples.

Log in om toegang te krijgen

Met onderstaand(e) abonnement(en) heeft u direct toegang:

BSL Psychologie Totaal

Met BSL Psychologie Totaal blijft u als professional steeds op de hoogte van de nieuwste ontwikkelingen binnen uw vak. Met het online abonnement heeft u toegang tot een groot aantal boeken, protocollen, vaktijdschriften en e-learnings op het gebied van psychologie en psychiatrie. Zo kunt u op uw gemak en wanneer het u het beste uitkomt verdiepen in uw vakgebied.

Literatuur
Over dit artikel

Andere artikelen Uitgave 11/2015

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 11/2015 Naar de uitgave

SI: Emotion Regulation and Psychiatric Comorbidity in ASD

Neural Mechanisms of Emotion Regulation in Autism Spectrum Disorder