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Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence 1/2022

18-09-2021 | Empirical Research

Correlates of Early Adolescents’ Social Media Engagement: The Role of Pubertal Status and Social Goals

Auteurs: Jill M. Swirsky, Michelle Rosie, Hongling Xie

Gepubliceerd in: Journal of Youth and Adolescence | Uitgave 1/2022

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Abstract

Specific social media behaviors have been found to be differentially associated with adjustment outcomes; however, the extant research has yet to consider the motivations behind why adolescents engage in these specific behaviors. This study examined the role of two developmentally relevant motivational correlates (social goals and pubertal status) on four social media behaviors (self-disclosure, self-presentation, social monitoring, and lurking) and two time-based measures of social media use (daily number of hours on social media and frequency of social media use). Self-report data were collected from 426 middle-school students (54.2% female, 73.6% White, 11.5% Black, 4.8% Hispanic, 10.1% other ethnicity, and mean age = 12.91). Social goals and pubertal status were distinctly associated with different social media behaviors, with some relevant sex differences. Popularity goal was positively associated with all six measures of social media engagement, although the associations for self-presentation and social monitoring were stronger for girls. Sex differences in lurking followed the same pattern but did not reach significance. Acceptance goal was associated with fewer hours spent on social media for girls only. Early developers reported more self-disclosure and lurking behaviors, and marginally more social monitoring (girls only). These findings indicate the importance of identifying motivational factors, especially social goals, when considering early adolescents’ social media behaviors.
Literatuur
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Metagegevens
Titel
Correlates of Early Adolescents’ Social Media Engagement: The Role of Pubertal Status and Social Goals
Auteurs
Jill M. Swirsky
Michelle Rosie
Hongling Xie
Publicatiedatum
18-09-2021
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Journal of Youth and Adolescence / Uitgave 1/2022
Print ISSN: 0047-2891
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-6601
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10964-021-01494-0