Skip to main content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research 1/2016

23-12-2014 | Original Article

Combined visual illusion effects on the perceived index of difficulty and movement outcomes in discrete and continuous fitts’ tapping

Auteurs: Sushma Alphonsa, Boyi Dai, Tami Benham-Deal, Qin Zhu

Gepubliceerd in: Psychological Research | Uitgave 1/2016

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

The speed-accuracy trade-off is a fundamental movement problem that has been extensively investigated. It has been established that the speed at which one can move to tap targets depends on how large the targets are and how far they are apart. These spatial properties of the targets can be quantified by the index of difficulty (ID). Two visual illusions are known to affect the perception of target size and movement amplitude: the Ebbinghaus illusion and Muller-Lyer illusion. We created visual images that combined these two visual illusions to manipulate the perceived ID, and then examined people’s visual perception of the targets in illusory context as well as their performance in tapping those targets in both discrete and continuous manners. The findings revealed that the combined visual illusions affected the perceived ID similarly in both discrete and continuous judgment conditions. However, the movement outcomes were affected by the combined visual illusions according to the tapping mode. In discrete tapping, the combined visual illusions affected both movement accuracy and movement amplitude such that the effective ID resembled the perceived ID. In continuous tapping, none of the movement outcomes were affected by the combined visual illusions. Participants tapped the targets with higher speed and accuracy in all visual conditions. Based on these findings, we concluded that distinct visual-motor control mechanisms were responsible for execution of discrete and continuous Fitts’ tapping. Although discrete tapping relies on allocentric information (object-centered) to plan for action, continuous tapping relies on egocentric information (self-centered) to control for action. The planning-control model for rapid aiming movements is supported.
Voetnoten
1
We did not counterbalance the order of tasks in this study because we were mainly interested in the effect of perception on action. However, the reverse order of tasks was used in a separate study (manuscript is in preparation), in which the effect of task order was examined to show the co-influence of perception and action.
 
2
The post hoc analyses were performed on the horizontal and vertical errors separately, and the similar effect of visual condition was found although the effect was more significant in the horizontal direction than in the vertical direction. Therefore, the radial error was used to reflect the influence of the combined visual illusions on the movement accuracy in both horizontal and vertical directions.
 
3
Since target width (W) is thought ofas the allowed error tolerance in the final position (see page 225 in Revett, 2008), we used the inverse of R e to represent the effective target width.
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Aglioti, S., DeSouza, J. F., & Goodale, M. A. (1995). Size-contrast illusions deceive the eye but not the hand. Current Biology, 5(6), 679–685. PubMedCrossRef Aglioti, S., DeSouza, J. F., & Goodale, M. A. (1995). Size-contrast illusions deceive the eye but not the hand. Current Biology, 5(6), 679–685. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Bootsma, R. J., Fernandez, L., & Mottet, D. (2004). Behind Fitts’ law: kinematic patterns in goal-directed movements. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 61(6), 811–821. CrossRef Bootsma, R. J., Fernandez, L., & Mottet, D. (2004). Behind Fitts’ law: kinematic patterns in goal-directed movements. International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 61(6), 811–821. CrossRef
go back to reference Brenner, E., & van Damme, W. J. (1999). Perceived distance, shape and size. Vision Research, 39(5), 975–986. PubMedCrossRef Brenner, E., & van Damme, W. J. (1999). Perceived distance, shape and size. Vision Research, 39(5), 975–986. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Button, C., Bennett, S., & Davids, K. (1998). Coordination dynamics of rhythmical and discrete prehension movements: Implications of the scanning procedure and individual differences. Human Movement Science, 17(6), 801–820. CrossRef Button, C., Bennett, S., & Davids, K. (1998). Coordination dynamics of rhythmical and discrete prehension movements: Implications of the scanning procedure and individual differences. Human Movement Science, 17(6), 801–820. CrossRef
go back to reference Cañal-Bruland, R., Voorwald, F., Wielaard, K., & van der Kamp, J. (2013). Dissociations between vision for perception and vision for action depend on the relative availability of egocentric and allocentric information. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 75(6), 1206–1214. CrossRef Cañal-Bruland, R., Voorwald, F., Wielaard, K., & van der Kamp, J. (2013). Dissociations between vision for perception and vision for action depend on the relative availability of egocentric and allocentric information. Attention, Perception, & Psychophysics, 75(6), 1206–1214. CrossRef
go back to reference Fitts, P. M. (1954). The information capacity of the human motor system in controlling the amplitude of movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 47, 381–391. PubMedCrossRef Fitts, P. M. (1954). The information capacity of the human motor system in controlling the amplitude of movement. Journal of Experimental Psychology, 47, 381–391. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Franz, V. H., Fahle, M., Bülthoff, H. H., & Gegenfurtner, K. R. (2001). Effects of visual illusions on grasping. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(5), 1124–1144. PubMed Franz, V. H., Fahle, M., Bülthoff, H. H., & Gegenfurtner, K. R. (2001). Effects of visual illusions on grasping. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(5), 1124–1144. PubMed
go back to reference Franz, V. H., Gegenfurtner, K. R., Bülthoff, H. H., & Fahle, M. (2000). Grasping visual illusions: No evidence for a dissociation between perception and action. Psychological Science, 11(1), 20–25. PubMedCrossRef Franz, V. H., Gegenfurtner, K. R., Bülthoff, H. H., & Fahle, M. (2000). Grasping visual illusions: No evidence for a dissociation between perception and action. Psychological Science, 11(1), 20–25. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Gentilucci, M., Chieffi, S., Daprati, E., Saetti, M. C., & Toni, I. (1996). Visual illusion and action. Neuropsychologia, 34(5), 369–376. PubMedCrossRef Gentilucci, M., Chieffi, S., Daprati, E., Saetti, M. C., & Toni, I. (1996). Visual illusion and action. Neuropsychologia, 34(5), 369–376. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Glover, S. (2002). Visual illusions affect planning but not control. Trends in cognitive sciences, 6(7), 288–292. PubMedCrossRef Glover, S. (2002). Visual illusions affect planning but not control. Trends in cognitive sciences, 6(7), 288–292. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Glover, S., & Dixon, P. (2001a). Dynamic illusion effects in a reaching task: evidence for separate visual representations in the planning and control of reaching. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 560–572. PubMed Glover, S., & Dixon, P. (2001a). Dynamic illusion effects in a reaching task: evidence for separate visual representations in the planning and control of reaching. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 27(3), 560–572. PubMed
go back to reference Glover, S., & Dixon, P. (2001b). Motor adaptation to an optical illusion. Experimental Brain Research, 137(2), 254–258. PubMedCrossRef Glover, S., & Dixon, P. (2001b). Motor adaptation to an optical illusion. Experimental Brain Research, 137(2), 254–258. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Gogel, W. C., & Tietz, J. D. (1973). Absolute motion parallax and the specific distance tendency. Perception and Psychophysics, 13(2), 284–292. CrossRef Gogel, W. C., & Tietz, J. D. (1973). Absolute motion parallax and the specific distance tendency. Perception and Psychophysics, 13(2), 284–292. CrossRef
go back to reference Goodale, M. A., Meenan, J. P., Bülthoff, H. H., Nicolle, D. A., Murphy, K. J., & Racicot, C. I. (1994). Separate neural pathways for the visual analysis of object shape in perception and prehension. Current Biology, 4(7), 604–610. PubMedCrossRef Goodale, M. A., Meenan, J. P., Bülthoff, H. H., Nicolle, D. A., Murphy, K. J., & Racicot, C. I. (1994). Separate neural pathways for the visual analysis of object shape in perception and prehension. Current Biology, 4(7), 604–610. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Goodale, M. A., & Milner, A. D. (1992). Separate visual pathways for perception and action. Trends in Neurosciences, 15(1), 20–25. PubMedCrossRef Goodale, M. A., & Milner, A. D. (1992). Separate visual pathways for perception and action. Trends in Neurosciences, 15(1), 20–25. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Goodale, M. A., Milner, A. D., Jakobson, L. S., & Carey, D. P. (1991). A neurological dissociation between perceiving objects and grasping them. Nature, 349(6305), 154–156. PubMedCrossRef Goodale, M. A., Milner, A. D., Jakobson, L. S., & Carey, D. P. (1991). A neurological dissociation between perceiving objects and grasping them. Nature, 349(6305), 154–156. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Guiard, Y. (1993). On Fitts’s and Hooke’s laws: Simple harmonic movement in upper-limb cyclical aiming. Acta Psychologica, 82(1), 139–159. PubMedCrossRef Guiard, Y. (1993). On Fitts’s and Hooke’s laws: Simple harmonic movement in upper-limb cyclical aiming. Acta Psychologica, 82(1), 139–159. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Guiard, Y. (1997). Fitts’ law in the discrete vs. cyclical paradigm. Human Movement Science, 16(1), 97–131. CrossRef Guiard, Y. (1997). Fitts’ law in the discrete vs. cyclical paradigm. Human Movement Science, 16(1), 97–131. CrossRef
go back to reference Hochberg, J. E., & McAlister, E. (1955). Relative size vs. familiar size in the perception of represented depth. The American Journal of Psychology, 68(2), 294–296. PubMedCrossRef Hochberg, J. E., & McAlister, E. (1955). Relative size vs. familiar size in the perception of represented depth. The American Journal of Psychology, 68(2), 294–296. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Meegan, D. V., Glazebrook, C. M., Dhillon, V. P., Tremblay, L., Welsh, T. N., & Elliott, D. (2004). The Müller-Lyer illusion affects the planning and control of manual aiming movements. Experimental Brain Research, 155(1), 37–47. PubMedCrossRef Meegan, D. V., Glazebrook, C. M., Dhillon, V. P., Tremblay, L., Welsh, T. N., & Elliott, D. (2004). The Müller-Lyer illusion affects the planning and control of manual aiming movements. Experimental Brain Research, 155(1), 37–47. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Morrison, J. D., & Whiteside, T. C. D. (1984). Binocular cues in the perception of distance of a point source of light. Perception, 13(5), 555–566. PubMedCrossRef Morrison, J. D., & Whiteside, T. C. D. (1984). Binocular cues in the perception of distance of a point source of light. Perception, 13(5), 555–566. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Nemati, F. (2009). Size and direction of distortion in geometric-optical illusions: conciliation between the Muller-Lyer and Titchener configurations. Perception, 38(11), 1585–1600. PubMedCrossRef Nemati, F. (2009). Size and direction of distortion in geometric-optical illusions: conciliation between the Muller-Lyer and Titchener configurations. Perception, 38(11), 1585–1600. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Revett, K. (2008). Behavioral biometrics: a remote access approach. New york: Wiley. CrossRef Revett, K. (2008). Behavioral biometrics: a remote access approach. New york: Wiley. CrossRef
go back to reference Roberts, B., Harris, M. G., & Yates, T. A. (2005). The roles of inducer size and distance in the Ebbinghaus illusion (Titchener circles). Perception, 34(7), 847–856. PubMedCrossRef Roberts, B., Harris, M. G., & Yates, T. A. (2005). The roles of inducer size and distance in the Ebbinghaus illusion (Titchener circles). Perception, 34(7), 847–856. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Schmidt, R. A., Zelaznik, H., Hawkins, B., Frank, J. S., & Quinn, J. T, Jr. (1979). Motor-output variability: a theory for the accuracy of rapid motor acts. Psychological Review, 86(5), 415–451. CrossRef Schmidt, R. A., Zelaznik, H., Hawkins, B., Frank, J. S., & Quinn, J. T, Jr. (1979). Motor-output variability: a theory for the accuracy of rapid motor acts. Psychological Review, 86(5), 415–451. CrossRef
go back to reference Smeets, J. B., & Brenner, E. (2006). 10 years of illusions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32(6), 1501–1504. PubMed Smeets, J. B., & Brenner, E. (2006). 10 years of illusions. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 32(6), 1501–1504. PubMed
go back to reference van Donkelaar, P. (1999). Pointing movements are affected by size-contrast illusions. Experimental Brain Research, 125(4), 517–520. PubMedCrossRef van Donkelaar, P. (1999). Pointing movements are affected by size-contrast illusions. Experimental Brain Research, 125(4), 517–520. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Viguier, A., Clement, G., & Trotter, Y. (2001). Distance perception within near visual space. Perception, 30(1), 115–124. PubMedCrossRef Viguier, A., Clement, G., & Trotter, Y. (2001). Distance perception within near visual space. Perception, 30(1), 115–124. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Wing, A. M., & Kristofferson, A. B. (1973). The timing of interresponse intervals. Perception and Psychophysics, 13(3), 455–460. CrossRef Wing, A. M., & Kristofferson, A. B. (1973). The timing of interresponse intervals. Perception and Psychophysics, 13(3), 455–460. CrossRef
go back to reference Witt, J. K., Linkenauger, S. A., & Proffitt, D. R. (2012). Get me out of this slump! Visual illusions improve sports performance. Psychological Science, 23(4), 397–399. PubMedCrossRef Witt, J. K., Linkenauger, S. A., & Proffitt, D. R. (2012). Get me out of this slump! Visual illusions improve sports performance. Psychological Science, 23(4), 397–399. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Woodworth, R. S. (1899). Accuracy of voluntary movement. The Psychological Review: Monograph Supplements, 3(3), i. Woodworth, R. S. (1899). Accuracy of voluntary movement. The Psychological Review: Monograph Supplements, 3(3), i.
go back to reference Zelaznik, H. N., & Lantero, D. (1996). The role of vision in repetitive circle drawing. Acta Psychologica, 92(1), 105–118. PubMedCrossRef Zelaznik, H. N., & Lantero, D. (1996). The role of vision in repetitive circle drawing. Acta Psychologica, 92(1), 105–118. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Zelaznik, H. N., Spencer, R., & Ivry, R. B. (2002). Dissociation of explicit and implicit timing in repetitive tapping and drawing movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 28(3), 575–588. PubMed Zelaznik, H. N., Spencer, R., & Ivry, R. B. (2002). Dissociation of explicit and implicit timing in repetitive tapping and drawing movements. Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 28(3), 575–588. PubMed
Metagegevens
Titel
Combined visual illusion effects on the perceived index of difficulty and movement outcomes in discrete and continuous fitts’ tapping
Auteurs
Sushma Alphonsa
Boyi Dai
Tami Benham-Deal
Qin Zhu
Publicatiedatum
23-12-2014
Uitgeverij
Springer Berlin Heidelberg
Gepubliceerd in
Psychological Research / Uitgave 1/2016
Print ISSN: 0340-0727
Elektronisch ISSN: 1430-2772
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s00426-014-0641-x

Andere artikelen Uitgave 1/2016

Psychological Research 1/2016 Naar de uitgave