Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

01-03-2009 | Brief Report | Uitgave 3/2009

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 3/2009

Brief Report: Decoding Representations: How Children with Autism Understand Drawings

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders > Uitgave 3/2009
Auteur:
Melissa L. Allen

Abstract

Young typically developing children can reason about abstract depictions if they know the intention of the artist. Children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), who are notably impaired in social, ‘intention monitoring’ domains, may have great difficulty in decoding vague representations. In Experiment 1, children with ASD are unable to use another person’s eye gaze as a cue for figuring out what an abstract picture represents. In contrast, when the participants themselves are the artists (Experiment 2), children with ASD are equally proficient as controls at identifying their own perceptually identical pictures (e.g. lollipop and balloon) after a delay, based upon what they intended them to be. Results are discussed in terms of intention and understanding of visual representation in autism.

Log in om toegang te krijgen

Met onderstaand(e) abonnement(en) heeft u direct toegang:

BSL Psychologie Totaal

Met BSL Psychologie Totaal blijft u als professional steeds op de hoogte van de nieuwste ontwikkelingen binnen uw vak. Met het online abonnement heeft u toegang tot een groot aantal boeken, protocollen, vaktijdschriften en e-learnings op het gebied van psychologie en psychiatrie. Zo kunt u op uw gemak en wanneer het u het beste uitkomt verdiepen in uw vakgebied.

Literatuur
Over dit artikel

Andere artikelen Uitgave 3/2009

Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders 3/2009 Naar de uitgave