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01-12-2013 | Commentary | Uitgave 1/2013 Open Access

Journal of Foot and Ankle Research 1/2013

Australian Diabetes Foot Network: practical guideline on the provision of footwear for people with diabetes

Tijdschrift:
Journal of Foot and Ankle Research > Uitgave 1/2013
Auteurs:
Shan M Bergin, Vanessa L Nube, Jan B Alford, Bernard P Allard, Joel M Gurr, Emma L Holland, Mark W Horsley, Maarten C Kamp, Peter A Lazzarini, Ashim K Sinha, Jason T Warnock, Paul R Wraight
Belangrijke opmerkingen

Competing interests

The authors have no relevant conflict of interest to disclose.

Authors’ contributions

This manuscript was conceived, developed and approved by the Australian Diabetes Foot Network (ADFN). The ADFN is a working group of the Australian Diabetes Society and members include health professionals from endocrinology, podiatry, nursing/diabetes education, indigenous health, orthopaedic surgery and vascular surgery. Each member of the ADFN is an author of this manuscript, contributed to its development, agrees with its recommendations and approved the final manuscript.

Abstract

Trauma, in the form of pressure and/or friction from footwear, is a common cause of foot ulceration in people with diabetes. These practical recommendations regarding the provision of footwear for people with diabetes were agreed upon following review of existing position statements and clinical guidelines. The aim of this process was not to re-invent existing guidelines but to provide practical guidance for health professionals on how they can best deliver these recommendations within the Australian health system. Where information was lacking or inconsistent, a consensus was reached following discussion by all authors. Appropriately prescribed footwear, used alone or in conjunction with custom-made foot orthoses, can reduce pedal pressures and reduce the risk of foot ulceration. It is important for all health professionals involved in the care of people with diabetes to both assess and make recommendations on the footwear needs of their clients or to refer to health professionals with such skills and knowledge. Individuals with more complex footwear needs (for example those who require custom-made medical grade footwear and orthoses) should be referred to health professionals with experience in the prescription of these modalities and who are able to provide appropriate and timely follow-up. Where financial disadvantage is a barrier to individuals acquiring appropriate footwear, health care professionals should be aware of state and territory based equipment funding schemes that can provide financial assistance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and people living in rural and remote areas are likely to have limited access to a broad range of footwear. Provision of appropriate footwear to people with diabetes in these communities needs be addressed as part of a comprehensive national strategy to reduce the burden of diabetes and its complications on the health system.

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