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24-10-2020 | ORIGINAL PAPER

Applying Generalizability Theory to Differentiate Between Trait and State in the Interpersonal Mindfulness Scale (IMS)

Auteurs: Rebecca A. Chalmers, Steven D. Pratscher, B. Ann Bettencourt, Oleg N. Medvedev

Gepubliceerd in: Mindfulness | Uitgave 3/2021

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Abstract

Objectives

The Interpersonal Mindfulness Scale (IMS) is a recently developed measure to assess mindfulness in the context of interpersonal interactions. The IMS showed promising psychometric properties and is considered to be a trait measure, but its temporal reliability and ability to distinguish trait from state have not been rigorously examined using appropriate methods. Generalizability theory (G-theory) is increasingly used to differentiate between trait and state aspects and identify sources of error affecting a measure. This trait/state distinction is important because it is required for evaluation of long-term effects of mindfulness-based training, especially those targeting interpersonal relationships.

Methods

Responses of 116 participants who completed the scale at three occasions, with 1-month intervals, were analyzed using G-theory and person by item by occasion longitudinal observation design.

Results

The 27-item IMS demonstrated strong reliability and generalizability of scores across persons and occasions in measuring interpersonal mindfulness as a trait with G-coefficients of 0.84-0.91. Individual subscales were less reliable. Further investigation combining the most stable items into a trait-only measure did not result in a more reliable measure, nor did combining the least stable items into a state-only measure.

Conclusions

This study supported good psychometric properties of the full IMS as a measure of a trait with the total scores generalizable across people and occasions. These findings suggest that the IMS total trait scores can be used to reliably evaluate long-term effects of interventions aiming to enhance interpersonal mindfulness.
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Metagegevens
Titel
Applying Generalizability Theory to Differentiate Between Trait and State in the Interpersonal Mindfulness Scale (IMS)
Auteurs
Rebecca A. Chalmers
Steven D. Pratscher
B. Ann Bettencourt
Oleg N. Medvedev
Publicatiedatum
24-10-2020
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Mindfulness / Uitgave 3/2021
Print ISSN: 1868-8527
Elektronisch ISSN: 1868-8535
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s12671-020-01520-5

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