Skip to main content
main-content
Top

Tip

Swipe om te navigeren naar een ander artikel

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research 3/2013

01-06-2013 | Original Article

Alcohol Expectancies and Alcohol Use Frequency: Does Drinking Context Matter?

Auteurs: Lindsay S. Ham, Byron L. Zamboanga, Ana J. Bridges, Hilary G. Casner, Amy K. Bacon

Gepubliceerd in: Cognitive Therapy and Research | Uitgave 3/2013

Log in om toegang te krijgen
share
DELEN

Deel dit onderdeel of sectie (kopieer de link)

  • Optie A:
    Klik op de rechtermuisknop op de link en selecteer de optie “linkadres kopiëren”
  • Optie B:
    Deel de link per e-mail

Abstract

Although alcohol use varies across settings, current measures of alcohol outcome expectancies (i.e., perceived likelihood of experiencing a drinking outcome; AOE) and valuations (i.e., desirability of specific drinking outcomes) do not specify the drinking context explicitly. Therefore, the contextual factors (which may affect both AOE and valuations) respondents use when completing these measures are unknown and make interpretation of measures potentially challenging. As such, the present study examined AOE and valuations among 334 college student drinkers (71.0 % women; M age = 21.05; 74 % Hispanic) as a function of three drinking contexts: convivial (e.g., at a party, a bar), negative coping (e.g., when experiencing negative affect), and personal-intimate (e.g., with a romantic partner, on a date). As expected, results indicated that endorsement of AOE and valuations differed by context. Participants generally perceived the effects of alcohol—both positive (e.g., I would be friendly) and negative (e.g., I would be clumsy)—as being less likely to occur and less desirable in the negative coping context than in convivial and personal-intimate contexts. Patterns of AOE and valuations for convivial and personal-intimate context varied by specific drinking outcomes; however, all valuations of negative effects were rated highest in the personal-intimate context. Further, certain context-specific beliefs about the effects of alcohol were differentially associated with reported frequency of alcohol use in each context. Findings suggest that context should be made explicit by researchers and clinicians in assessment and intervention of college student drinking.
Voetnoten
1
We also conducted regression analyses that included gender × AOE and gender × valuations interaction terms for each criterion variable (i.e., frequency of alcohol use convivial, negative coping, or personal-intimate drinking contexts). The gender interaction terms were not significant. Further, there were significant problems with multicolinearity among the interaction terms. In light of power concerns, non-significant findings, and multicolinearity problems, we opted to control for gender, rather than include gender interaction terms, for the alcohol use frequency regression analyses.
 
2
Due to non-normality of residuals in the multiple regression for frequency of alcohol use in negative coping contexts, we dichotomized this variable (no use versus any use in negative coping contexts) and re-ran the analysis using logistic regression. As found in the linear multiple regression analysis, risk and aggression AOE was the only predictor that made a unique statistically significant contribution to the model. When controlling for gender and the other AOE, a one-unit decrease in risk and aggression AOE in negative coping contexts was associated with a 2.0 times greater likelihood of alcohol use in negative coping contexts. Similar to the linear regression analyses, no other AOE or valuations predictors made unique statistically significant contributions to the model.
 
Literatuur
go back to reference Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall. Bandura, A. (1977). Social learning theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.
go back to reference Carey, K. B. (1993). Situational determinants of heavy drinking among college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 40(2), 217–220. CrossRef Carey, K. B. (1993). Situational determinants of heavy drinking among college students. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 40(2), 217–220. CrossRef
go back to reference Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1995). Constructing validity: Basic issues in objective scale development. Psychological Assessment, 7(3), 309–319. CrossRef Clark, L. A., & Watson, D. (1995). Constructing validity: Basic issues in objective scale development. Psychological Assessment, 7(3), 309–319. CrossRef
go back to reference Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates. Cohen, J. (1988). Statistical power analysis for the behavioral sciences (2nd ed.). Mahwah, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associates.
go back to reference Dawson, D. A., Grant, B. F., Stinson, F. S., & Chou, P. S. (2004). Another look at heavy episodic drinking and alcohol use disorders among college and noncollege youth. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 65(4), 477–488. PubMed Dawson, D. A., Grant, B. F., Stinson, F. S., & Chou, P. S. (2004). Another look at heavy episodic drinking and alcohol use disorders among college and noncollege youth. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 65(4), 477–488. PubMed
go back to reference Goldman, M. S., Del Boca, F. K., & Darkes, J. (1999). Alcohol expectancy theory: The application of cognitive neuroscience. In H. Blane & K. Leonard (Eds.), Psychological theories of drinking and alcoholism (2nd ed., pp. 203–246). New York: Guilford Press. Goldman, M. S., Del Boca, F. K., & Darkes, J. (1999). Alcohol expectancy theory: The application of cognitive neuroscience. In H. Blane & K. Leonard (Eds.), Psychological theories of drinking and alcoholism (2nd ed., pp. 203–246). New York: Guilford Press.
go back to reference Ham, L. S., Stewart, S. H., Norton, P. J., & Hope, D. A. (2005). Psychometric assessment of the comprehensive effects of alcohol questionnaire: Comparing a brief version to the original full scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 27, 141–158. doi: 10.​1007/​s10862-005-0631-9. CrossRef Ham, L. S., Stewart, S. H., Norton, P. J., & Hope, D. A. (2005). Psychometric assessment of the comprehensive effects of alcohol questionnaire: Comparing a brief version to the original full scale. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 27, 141–158. doi: 10.​1007/​s10862-005-0631-9. CrossRef
go back to reference Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2005). Monitoring the Future national survey results on drug use, 1975– 2004. Volume II: College students and adults ages 19– 45 (NIH Publication No. 05-5728). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse. Johnston, L. D., O’Malley, P. M., Bachman, J. G., & Schulenberg, J. E. (2005). Monitoring the Future national survey results on drug use, 19752004. Volume II: College students and adults ages 1945 (NIH Publication No. 05-5728). Bethesda, MD: National Institute on Drug Abuse.
go back to reference Kent, R. A. (2001). Data construction and data analysis for survey research. New York: Palgrave. Kent, R. A. (2001). Data construction and data analysis for survey research. New York: Palgrave.
go back to reference Leigh, B. C., & Stacy, A. W. (1993). Alcohol outcome expectancies: Scale construction and predictive utility in higher order confirmatory models. Psychological Assessment, 5(2), 216–229. CrossRef Leigh, B. C., & Stacy, A. W. (1993). Alcohol outcome expectancies: Scale construction and predictive utility in higher order confirmatory models. Psychological Assessment, 5(2), 216–229. CrossRef
go back to reference Maisto, S. A., Carey, K. B., & Bradizza, C. M. (1999). Social learning theory. In H. Blane & K. Leonard (Eds.), Psychological theories of drinking and alcoholism (2nd ed., pp. 203–245). New York: Guilford. Maisto, S. A., Carey, K. B., & Bradizza, C. M. (1999). Social learning theory. In H. Blane & K. Leonard (Eds.), Psychological theories of drinking and alcoholism (2nd ed., pp. 203–245). New York: Guilford.
go back to reference Mohr, C. D., Armeli, S., Tennen, H., Carney, M. A., Affleck, G., & Hromi, A. (2001). Daily interpersonal experiences, context, and alcohol consumption: Crying in your beer and toasting the good time. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 489–500. doi: 10.​1037/​0022-3514.​80.​3.​489. PubMedCrossRef Mohr, C. D., Armeli, S., Tennen, H., Carney, M. A., Affleck, G., & Hromi, A. (2001). Daily interpersonal experiences, context, and alcohol consumption: Crying in your beer and toasting the good time. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, 80, 489–500. doi: 10.​1037/​0022-3514.​80.​3.​489. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Neighbors, C., Walker, D. D., & Larimer, M. E. (2003). Expectancies and evaluations of alcohol effects among college students: Self-determination as a moderator. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 64, 292–300. PubMed Neighbors, C., Walker, D. D., & Larimer, M. E. (2003). Expectancies and evaluations of alcohol effects among college students: Self-determination as a moderator. Journal of Studies on Alcohol, 64, 292–300. PubMed
go back to reference O’Hare, T. (1998). Alcohol expectancies and excessive drinking contexts in young adults. Social Work Research, 22(1), 44–50. CrossRef O’Hare, T. (1998). Alcohol expectancies and excessive drinking contexts in young adults. Social Work Research, 22(1), 44–50. CrossRef
go back to reference O’Hare, T., & Sherrer, M. V. (2005). Assessment of youthful problem drinkers: Validating the Drinking Context Scale (DSC09) with freshmen first offenders. Research on Social Work Practice, 15, 110–117. doi: 10.​1177/​1049731504269554​. CrossRef O’Hare, T., & Sherrer, M. V. (2005). Assessment of youthful problem drinkers: Validating the Drinking Context Scale (DSC09) with freshmen first offenders. Research on Social Work Practice, 15, 110–117. doi: 10.​1177/​1049731504269554​. CrossRef
go back to reference Patel, A. B., & Fromme, K. (2011). Explicit outcome expectancies and substance use: Current research and future directions. In L. M. Scheier (Ed.), Handbook of drug use etiology: Theory, methods, and empirical findings (pp. 147–162). Washington DC: American Psychological Association. Patel, A. B., & Fromme, K. (2011). Explicit outcome expectancies and substance use: Current research and future directions. In L. M. Scheier (Ed.), Handbook of drug use etiology: Theory, methods, and empirical findings (pp. 147–162). Washington DC: American Psychological Association.
go back to reference Reich, R. R., Below, M. C., & Goldman, M. S. (2010). Explicit and implicit measures of expectancy and related alcohol cognitions: A meta-analytic comparison. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 24, 13–25. doi: 10.​1037/​a0016556. PubMedCrossRef Reich, R. R., Below, M. C., & Goldman, M. S. (2010). Explicit and implicit measures of expectancy and related alcohol cognitions: A meta-analytic comparison. Psychology of Addictive Behaviors, 24, 13–25. doi: 10.​1037/​a0016556. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Sayette, M. A. (1993). An appraisal-disruption model of alcohol’s effects on stress responses in social drinkers. Psychological Bulletin, 114(3), 459–476. PubMedCrossRef Sayette, M. A. (1993). An appraisal-disruption model of alcohol’s effects on stress responses in social drinkers. Psychological Bulletin, 114(3), 459–476. PubMedCrossRef
go back to reference Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2010). Results from the 2009 national survey on drug use and health. Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H-38A, HHS Publication No. SMA 10-4586 Findings. Rockville, MD. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. (2010). Results from the 2009 national survey on drug use and health. Office of Applied Studies, NSDUH Series H-38A, HHS Publication No. SMA 10-4586 Findings. Rockville, MD.
go back to reference Young, R. M., & Knight, R. G. (1989). The Drinking Expectancy Questionnaire: A revised measure of alcohol-related beliefs. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 11, 99–112. doi: 10.​1007/​BF00962702. CrossRef Young, R. M., & Knight, R. G. (1989). The Drinking Expectancy Questionnaire: A revised measure of alcohol-related beliefs. Journal of Psychopathology and Behavioral Assessment, 11, 99–112. doi: 10.​1007/​BF00962702. CrossRef
go back to reference Young, R. M., Knight, R. G., & Oei, T. P. S. (1990). The stability of alcohol-related expectancies in social drinking situations. Australian Journal of Psychology, 42(3), 321–330. CrossRef Young, R. M., Knight, R. G., & Oei, T. P. S. (1990). The stability of alcohol-related expectancies in social drinking situations. Australian Journal of Psychology, 42(3), 321–330. CrossRef
go back to reference Zamboanga, B. L., Schwartz, S. J., Ham, L. S., Borsari, B., & Van Tyne, K. (2010). Alcohol expectancies, pregaming, and risky drinking behaviors in a multiethnic sample of college students. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 34, 124–133. doi: 10.​1007/​s10608-009-9234-1. CrossRef Zamboanga, B. L., Schwartz, S. J., Ham, L. S., Borsari, B., & Van Tyne, K. (2010). Alcohol expectancies, pregaming, and risky drinking behaviors in a multiethnic sample of college students. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 34, 124–133. doi: 10.​1007/​s10608-009-9234-1. CrossRef
Metagegevens
Titel
Alcohol Expectancies and Alcohol Use Frequency: Does Drinking Context Matter?
Auteurs
Lindsay S. Ham
Byron L. Zamboanga
Ana J. Bridges
Hilary G. Casner
Amy K. Bacon
Publicatiedatum
01-06-2013
Uitgeverij
Springer US
Gepubliceerd in
Cognitive Therapy and Research / Uitgave 3/2013
Print ISSN: 0147-5916
Elektronisch ISSN: 1573-2819
DOI
https://doi.org/10.1007/s10608-012-9493-0